January 25-27, 2017: Join Rave at the SC Sheriffs’ Association Winter Conference

January 25-27, 2017, Rave Mobile Safety will be exhibiting at the SC Sheriffs’ Association Winter Conference in Columbia, South Carolina.

Stop by the Rave booth for a fresh look at our leading emergency notification system and the latest technology in Rave’s safety platform.  We look forward to seeing you there!

January 18-20, 2017: Join Rave at the Florida College System Council of Business Affairs Conference (COBA)

Rave Mobile Safety is excited to be exhibiting at the Council of Business Affairs (COBA) Conference in Daytona, FL on January 18-20, 2017.

Visit the Rave team to learn more about the latest technology in emergency notification and safety solutions protecting millions of Americans nationwide.

 

 

 

Rave Panic Button and Non-Active Shooter Emergencies

Over the past year, Rave Panic Button has been activated over 5,000 times across the country. While we have some amazing documented stories of helping responders avert potential active assailant incidents (view a news clip about one incident here), the reality is that most incidents are far more mundane. Every day schools have medical emergencies which require EMS response. Every day administrators and teachers communicate internally using our “Staff Assist” function when there are minor issues requiring rapid communication and coordination (my personal favorite is the parent irate over their child’s report card).

The fact that Rave Panic Button is used far more often for non-assailant type emergencies should not be a surprise. So then why mention it? The truth is that we have to plan for the horrific possibility of an active shooter. Our processes and emergency technologies need to support a rapid response (see more about how Rave Panic Button works here). However, during the “fight or flight” moment when the unthinkable happens, your staff will be far better prepared when the solution they are to use is part of their muscle memory, something that they are used to using in day to day activities. The lesson learned from our thousands of activations is that the more a part of the daily work flow of your users, the more likely it will be used when it’s most needed.

Communicate Quicker With Campus Police

The app also allows students to text tips to police

SPRINGFIELD, Mass. (WWLP) – Western New England University has been using a new piece of technology to help with public safety.

It’s an app that can be downloaded onto a student’s phone that’s called Rave Guardian. It allows police dispatch to send emergency notifications out to students, but it also allows students to send them feedback.

Students can now have direct communication with police to let them know where they are and if they need help using GPS.

Chief Adam Woodrow WNEU Director of Public Safety told 22News, “The first that we found that really offered that two way communication to be able to send information out in times of emergency or for snow or for weather issues but also to capture information from our community.”

“It’s very helpful to have, if it’s dark out you might want someone to know you’re walking back and if you live about the five minute walk to your residence hall. Then you might want to have it on just in case” said, Chas Figueroa a student at WNEU.

The app also allows students to text tips to police along with photographs.

Rave Mobile Safety 2016 Product Review

Rave Mobile Safety 2016 Product Review

2016 brought great growth and product development here at Rave Mobile Safety. We are proud to have worked with our customers and partners to bring enhancements and innovation to the products we develop trusted to save lives.

Check out the highlights of the newest enhancements and features to the Rave data and critical communication platform.

February:

Storm-Based Weather Alerting

Rave Alert customers can now leverage the National Weather Service (NWS) Storm-Based Warnings. If your domain includes Smart911 citizen opt-in or loaded landline data, you can also configure Rave Alert to automatically notify residents whose addresses fall within National Weather Service Storm-Based Warnings.

April:

Alert to Guardian

Emergency Notification and Campus Safety App
(Image: The integration of Rave’s Emergency Notification System and Campus Safety App)

April saw the integration between Rave Alert and Rave Guardian. Customers with Rave Guardian can now send targeted alerts directly to app users.

Additionally, improved session management in Rave Alert  means authors are warned when a session will soon expire, with the option to extend the session.

May:

Alert Tagging

In May, we released Alert Tagging, which lets you put custom searchable labels on alerts and reports. You can now enter tags in the new tag field in an alert template or an alert report to group multiple alerts and make reporting easier.

July:

Improved User and List Management

This release introduced new administrative permissions to help delegate user and list management more easily. Now you can set administrators scope, which controls the pool of users that administrators can access in the system – whether for sending alerts, building lists, or managing user information.

October:

Chat Notifications

In October, Rave 911 Suite Chat Smartlets saw improved notification behavior. It now shows  counts of unread messages and clearly indicates which tickets have unread messages. The Chat Smartlet also shows information on success or failure of an SMS chat send.

November:

HTML Emails

As of November, Rave Alert can now format email alerts with html tools to emphasize or clarify message content. You can apply text and paragraph formatting, insert images, and paste from other sources like Microsoft Word or the web. You can pre-save html content in email profiles for quick use when configuring alerts.

Looking forward to 2017

We’re looking forward advancing into 2017 as we continue to expand our product features and connect millions of people to those trusted to protect them. Thank you to all who helped make 2016 a successful year. We look forward to what 2017 will bring!

 

DuPage County Brief: Making 2017 Safer with Smart911

Making 2017 Safer with Smart911

DuPage County is urging residents to make the New Year safer by signing up for Smart911.

Smart911 is a free public safety service available to anyone who lives, works or visits DuPage County. Users create a secure, private online safety profile that includes essential household information about family members, home, pets and vehicles. When users call 911, the profile appears on the dispatcher’s screen, and the dispatcher can convey any critical information to first responders answering the call.

Smart911 users can create their profile at www.smart911.com. Users decide what important information they share, but they can include anything that may be needed in an emergency, including:

  • Family members’ ages, photos or physical descriptions
  • Information about their home, including address, utility shutoff valves and key holders
  • Medical information, such as medications, medical conditions or disabilities
  • Special considerations like language restrictions, restraining orders or rescue notes

Smart911 is valuable when unresponsive callers are unable to speak due to a medical condition, or in a house fire when first responders need to locate family members or pets. Because users can include photos in their profiles, Smart911 can also save valuable time if a child goes missing.

One other important feature: More than 70 percent of 911 calls come from mobile phones. That cell phone’s exact location can’t always be determined by GPS from a cell tower. Smart911 displays the listed address of the mobile phone in the profile and can track the call via GPS, even if the call is disconnected.

DuPage County was the first county in Illinois to offer Smart911; since its introduction in 2011, more than 29,000 residents have created safety profiles. Learn more on the DuPage ETSB webpage at www.dupageco.org/smart911 and register at www.smart911.com.

Source: Chronicle Illinois

How Emergency Response Centers Can Get More Data From Callers

To improve public safety response and preparedness, municipalities are signing up for an enhanced 911 solution that provides emergency dispatchers with more information about participating callers.

The Smart911 service lets users create an online safety profile that includes any information on themselves, their families or households that they would want 911 response teams to have in an emergency. Any public-safety answering point with the Smart911 software will be able to see this information when a registered user calls.

The Mountain Valley Emergency Communication Center in New Jersey, which covers the city of Summit, the borough of New Providence and the township of Millburn, was the first in the state to adopt Smart911 in late 2015.

“It provides great supplemental data that is often missed when people call 911 from wireless devices,” said Scott Ruf, executive director at Mountain Valley Emergency Communications Center. Ruf had used Smart911 when he was director of emergency communications for Douglas County, Kan., and brought the solution to New Jersey shortly after the center opened.

“In just the 911 industry alone, we’re seeing significant increases in wireless communications from citizens,” Ruf told GCN. That, combined with the area’s dense population, made Smart911 a great fit for the community, he said.

Rave Mobile Safety, a public safety solutions provider, developed the platform to provide more information to 911 centers when someone calls from a mobile device. According to Todd Miller, vice president of public safety at Rave, about 75 to 85 percent of calls coming into 911 are from mobile phones, which do not always provide accurate location data. In addition, during an emergency, callers can forget to share critical information that could help dispatchers.

Along with phone numbers and addresses, citizens can upload health and medical information, disabilities, photos and physical descriptions of themselves and family members to their safety profile. Facilities like office complexes, K-12 schools, university campuses and municipal buildings also can be registered. A facility’s profile could include floor plans, emergency response plans, employee rosters, building blueprints and emergency contact details. Users can geo-fence specific buildings enabling the display of critical facility information for every call made from that location — whether landline or wireless.

All this data is stored securely and privately within Rave’s national public safety infrastructure, a nationwide repository. Only those PSAPs with the Smart911 software installed can access the database. The software reads the PSAPs Automatic Number Identification and Automatic Location Identifier feed during an inbound call, and uses that information to search within the national database. If there is a match for a registered user, the system will open a pop-up window on the call-taker’s workstation with that caller’s safety profile.

“It fits seamlessly within the standard operating procedures of our PSAPs today. We don’t have to have 911 call-takers try to swivel [their] chair over to another system,” Miller said. Smart911 is used in more than 3,000 communities and 42 states, and a user’s profile is accessible in any jurisdiction using the software, he added.

According to Ruf, Smart911 is integrated with the Mountain Valley Emergency Communications Center’s phone system and computer-aided dispatch system, but the remote database is secured by Rave. “We can only access the database if a phone number registered with Smart911 dials 911,” he said. Responders can’t browse the nationwide repository.

The New Jersey center benefits from Smart911’s communication tools as well, specifically the two-way text messaging chat function. In the event of a 911 hang-up or dropped call, even if the caller does not have a profile, the call-taker can send a text message back to the phone to make sure there isn’t an emergency or to confirm that the caller is in danger.  (A 2015 report found that that nearly a third of mobile-phone calls to 911 are accidental.)

In the past couple months, the center also began using Smart911’s Rave Command View control center, which allows Ruf and his team to better manage system statistics — both historical and real-time data. “It gives us an idea of what’s going on and allows supervisors, when they can, to monitor what’s happening and jump-in and take over calls if the call-taker is also the dispatcher,” Ruf said.

The New Jersey center has been using Smart911 for about a year and has accessed safety profiles in life-saving situations. According to Miller, in Grand Traverse County, Mich., another Smart911 jurisdiction, having the correct home address in a caller’s safety profile shaved 11 minutes off the response time during a house fire.

“It’s not a hard sell when you look at the information we’re getting and how it’s utilized today,” he said.

Source: GCN

To Those Who Sacrifice Their Holiday for Others, Thank You

The holiday season is upon us and while many will enjoy time off and time spent with loved ones, there are those who have to work. For those who sacrifice their holidays to serve and save lives, we here at Rave Mobile Safety want to say thank you. We cannot overlook the immeasurable sacrifice of all the emergency responders and workers who help those in emergency situations over the holidays.

Thank you 9-1-1

The first first responders, dispatchers and 9-1-1 call takers, sacrifice their time and holiday’s to help people through what are often the worst experiences of their lives. Guiding people through emergencies and knowing what help to send and where to send it, these men and women work tirelessly to help those in need.  The holiday season often brings a rise in domestic situations and 9-1-1 dispatchers are assisting in these situations with those involved and simultaneously communicating with first responders being sent into these emergencies.

Thank you EMS
EMS workers walk into situations where medical attention is immediately needed and have very little information about the victim. They provide medical assistance outside of hospitals, often times working while transporting people.  Many EMS workers have shared that the hardest part of responding to these medical emergencies is when the situation hits close to home and working during the holidays can provide annual reminders of the hardest part of these men and women’s jobs.

Thank you Firefighters

The risk of home fires increases during the holiday season due to Christmas trees, candles, decorations, and frayed wires from old lights. Due to the nature of Christmas tree fires the likelihood of fatalities is five times higher than other house fires.  These firefighters give up their holidays at home to save the lives and homes of others.

Thank you Police

Conflicts arise around the holidays and stress levels soar resulting in police officers continually responding to calls of domestic disturbances. Every day these men and women in blue respond to some of the hardest and most violent moments of another person’s life, all to serve and protect. They give up the possible peace of their own homes to step into the chaos of someone else’s.

Working in emergency response comes with many burdens and annual reminders of some of these workers worst days. Thank you to all emergency workers who sacrifice time with their families and memories to help others and save lives.  Thank you and happy holiday’s from all of us here at Rave.

Smart911 Facilitates Emergency Response

Sometimes a few minutes can make the difference between life and death. Most people know to call 9-1-1 in an emergency, but in a trauma situation, callers often can’t think or speak clearly enough to give dispatchers the information they need to send the right kind of help, quickly.

Attendees at a recent “Coffee with the Chief” heard about a relatively new program – Smart911 – from J.P. French, director of Smart911 for the state of Arkansas.
Smart911 is a free service that allows individuals to provide information in a private and secure way that will allow responders to locate and help victims in an emergency.
Normally, when a 9-1-1 call is received by dispatchers at the Hot Springs Village Police Department, basic information appears on the screen; dispatchers attempt Smart911 facilitates emergency response to learn more about the emergency and any other information that will assist responders, but this takes precious time.

French, a former police chief of Cherokee Village, retired from the Arkansas Attorney General’s office and heads up a company called Rave Mobile Safety, which implemented the Smart911 program statewide in 2012. Arkansas was the first state to deploy the system, and the first state to sign up for the RAVE panic button system in schools (see below).

The program, which is “completely free,” according to French, allows households to enter information on the number of people normally in the house, number of bedrooms, hidden key location, door/gate access codes, vehicles and even pets. Information can be entered for each resident – medical conditions, allergies, medications, etc. Users can also upload photos of residents, which French said is invaluable in the case of a missing person (child or Alzheimer’s patient). License plate information that is readily available can put officers onto the trail of a stolen vehicle immediately.

French also said the additional information is useful when a person is unable to communicate, either because of a medical condition or the caller’s suspicion that an intruder may be in the house.
Asked about data security, French replied, “First of all, you can provide whatever information you’re comfortable with.” He then elaborated on access to information: the only time the information can be accessed is when a 9-1-1 call is made – “only the dispatcher can see the information, and only when you call 9-1-1.” The database is not searchable, and is only available for 45 minutes (except in the case of an “extended ordeal,” when a supervisor can override the 45-minute limit in 20-minute increments).

French said the company uses secure protocols and redundant (i.e., duplicate) servers, and conducts frequent audits.
Smart911 is a nationwide system and French said it can be very useful for travelers.

Although it is not a geographical system – meaning the call cannot be traced through Smart911 to a location – if a cell phone is tied to the user’s profile, all information will be available to dispatchers.

French said it is important to keep information current – “out-of-date information is worse than none.” The system sends out reminders every six months to update profiles – responders can either confirm that no changes have occurred or go to the website to update information.

Another program offered through the Smart911 system is Smart911Facility. Several issues confront responders to emergencies in businesses, churches, community centers, etc., and this program allows owners or managers to establish profiles to streamline response actions.

Information such as floor plans, phone numbers, contacts, gate or access codes, utility access and shutoff locations, location of AEDs, etc. can be entered; a “geo-fence” (using geographical coordinates) can be established on the boundaries of the property, and any calls from within that “fence” will trigger the facility profile. French said this “geo-fence” usually includes parking lots and outdoor areas, such as playgrounds, etc.

HSV Police Chief Ricky Middleton said Hot Springs Village does not currently utilize Smart911Facility, but notices have gone out to churches and other facilities in the area about the benefits of enrollment in the program.

Another program offered by the company is the RAVE Panic Button – a system used in schools, government facilities, etc. that facilitates notification of first responders, as well as employees, about emergency situations (for example, an active shooter in a school). All public schools (K-12) in Arkansas utilize the system.

For more information on Smart911, visit the website at www.smart911.com; information on Smart911Facility can be found at www.smart911facility.com.
Coffee with the Chief is held the second Tuesday of each month at 8 a.m. at the Police Training and Event Center on the corner of Balearic and Ponderosa Lane. The next session is Jan. 10, 2017.

Source: SW Times

What Are IWU’s Safety Protocols?

An attack on the Ohio State University campus took place last month and left many shocked and disheartened by the event.

“Mostly I’m just saddened by the attack on the Ohio State campus” Assistant Professor of History Dr. Stephen Pierce said. “It’s sad to see a student who feels so disenfranchised and so marginalized on Ohio State’s campus that he would take that out in a violent way on other students.”

Indiana Wesleyan University has many protocols in place to keep the students and faculty safe from attacks like these.

IWU takes several different precautions when trying to keep its faculty and students safe. According to Andrew Parker, dean for Developmental Learning, Campus Police has the Rave Guardian, a campus safety app where students can contact campus police very easily.

In addition to Rave Guardian, Parker said Campus Police is also going to introduce the Rave Panic app next semester to faculty and staff. He said this app is a “punch of a button” — where campus police are notified right away of the emergency and the location.

“At IWU I do feel safe,” AJ Wilk (fr) said. “We’ve had a couple of break-ins recently but right when the break-in happened they sent out a text so people were notified… I feel like our campus police do a pretty nice job of keeping us informed and safe.”

IWU has its own police department on campus, Campus Police, to help keep IWU safe and secure for all students, visitors and faculty members.

“Campus police has conducted trainings for faculty, for staff and even in residence halls related to active shooter and self-defense,” Parker said.  “(IWU also) maintains a working relationship with the Grant County school safety commission.”

Parker said on campus, IWU has its own emergency preparedness team, which is a group of people that focuses on the internal processes and plans for emergency situations and is continually improving revising those as needed.

“The best things students can do is to be aware of their surroundings and help us maintain security on campus.” said Parker “the more proactive we can be and the more prepared students can help minimize whatever impact can occur during an active shooter event or some other unfortunate event.”

Parker also encourages students to watch the video he sent out via e-mail to students that says students should do three things regarding an active shooter: run, hide and fight.

Wilk is glad IWU sent out an e-mail to the student body about campus safety.

“I think the safety protocols weren’t as well-known as they could’ve been before we had this incident” Wilk said. “But I think after this incident they did a nice job of getting it out there but I think what could’ve been better is us knowing earlier.”

In case of a campus attack, Parker said students are encouraged to call Campus Police at (765) 677-4911 and using the Rave Guardian app.

Source: The Sojourn

Campus IT And Emergency Officials Face A Variety Of Security Threats

Tulane University officials deploy “virtual escort” and tech alert systems to keep students safe.

The recent rampage by a knife-wielding attacker at The Ohio State University was a stark reminder of the security threats facing college and university campuses across the U.S. As campuses become more attuned to risks, they are looking to technology to support their security programs.

The threats to campuses aren’t just physical. Their information systems also are at increasing risk, oftentimes to more unpredictable threats, university IT specialists say.

“Colleges are typically seen as ripe testing grounds for new malware, a place to test out botnets because of the amount of bandwidth
and varying degrees of management around classroom computers and lab computers,” Hunter Ely, information security and policy officer at Tulane University in New Orleans, told EdScoop.

U.S. campuses are vulnerable to more atypical risks, Ely said. “We have a large Chinese student population and they tend to bring ‘interesting’ malware form China — something that has infected their machine there and then they bring it here and we discover it,” he said. “So we see a lot of threats that a lot of other verticals don’t see because of the various and diverse group of people we bring on campus, the openness of the network and the speed and size of the network.”

Hunter Ely, Tulane University Information Security and Policy Officer (Tulane University)

Tulane uses Louisiana’s state optical network, which has experienced “massive” denial-of-service attacks this year, Ely added. “That has affected us,” he said.

Ely said that phishing scams pose a particular challenge for campus IT managers.

“We have an increasing issue around spear phishing and phishing more generally,” he said. “Going forward, we need to do more in protecting the assets closer to the asset. In other words, we need to rely on firewalls to do their job but also rely on layers of security, particularly around two-factor authentication into our main systems, and more stringent security policies around those systems. Phishing is still and will continue to be one of the biggest issues that we face.”

Tulane offers online computer-security training for students. “It’s not mandatory, but it’s available,” Ely said. “We also do a tech day every year in the fall, where we give out prizes and talk about cyber security awareness month and about the variety of tips that go with that. We also have a Twitter account that’s pretty active and it seems like there’s fair portion of the population that likes interacting with us on that.”

Enhanced campus communications

Technology is “absolutely” critical to mitigating security threats and responding to emergency events on universities campuses, said Ely, whose role is to help architect and design technical solutions for security problems.

“We had a meeting [recently] to talk about how we can put into place a system that will allow us, for example, to lock down all of the exterior doors on campus with the push of the button and that requires technology,” he said.

To enhance its campus security posture, Tulane is using tools from Rave Mobile Safety, a firm that provides communications software designed to improve emergency preparedness and faster response to security situations.

Rave Guardian is a mobile phone application intended to enhance safety on campus through real-time interactive features that create a virtual safety network of friends, family and Tulane’s Campus Safety office. Any student can download the app and create a profile that includes their vital information.

Guardian includes a “panic button” that gives users a direct, immediate connection to Campus Safety with GPS location and personal profile information. Another feature is “tip texting,” which enables anonymous, two-way crime reporting via text and images.

“It allows our students to go from point-to-point with a virtual escort and gives them peace of mind,” said Norris Yarbrough, Tulane’s vice president for emergency preparedness and response. “It’s been well received by the community and it’s used all the time.”

Campus-safety officials have also deployed Rave’s Emergency Alert Notification System, which uses a spectrum of communication modes — including cell phones, landlines, email, text and social media — to send emergency alerts in seconds to entire campus populations.

Yarbrough said that Tulane officials were impressed by the system’s speed and reliability in delivering messages. “It’s an easy-to-use platform, but the biggest single driver was really speed and reliability,” he said. “That changed the game fairly substantially for us.”

While the Ohio State incident prompted “heightened security awareness” among emergency officials at Tulane, they decided that the situation in Columbus didn’t warrant alerts to Tulane students, Yarbrough said.

“We were in touch with our federal and state law-enforcement partners every day to see if there was any chatter or noise that might have increased because of that event,” he said. “The information we were getting back did not warrant any type of message to our students other than what they were already getting through social media.”

Source: EdScoop

MTSU Enhances Security

Middle Tennessee State University announced Thursday (Dec. 1) the creation and distribution of an active shooter guide as well as increased video surveillance and plans to reintroduce emergency call stations to the campus.

With the recent Ohio State University attack as the latest example of the security concerns facing campuses throughout the nation, MTSU’s Division of Student Affairs and University Police Department have been working throughout the semester to update emergency response information located on its website at http://mtsu.edu/alert4u and share more specific guidelines for active shooter responses.

Recently ranked among the Top 50 safest large universities in the nation by the website collegechoice.net, MTSU has developed pocket-sized active shooter cards that summarize the U.S. Department of Homeland Security
s “Run-Hide-Fight” guidelines that have been increasingly embraced by universities around the country, including Ohio State.

“It helps us provide some really important information to people before an incident so that hopefully in the throes of something serious happening, they will think about what they’ve (seen) and they

will have foundational knowledge to make good decisions and keep them safer,” University Police Chief Buddy Peaster said.

The active shooter cards provide brief summaries of basic steps to take under each phase of the “Run-Hide-Fight” protocol, such as having an escape route in mind when preparing to “run”; blocking entry and locking doors when you “hide”; and only “fight” as a last resort and when your life is imminent danger.

Dr. Deb Sells, vice president for student affairs and vice provost for enrollment and academic services, said the cards will be available while supplies last at key locations around campus such as the MT One Stop, Student Union, University Police Department and others for students, faculty and staff. The guidelines and an instructional video are also always available on the university’s website at http://www.mtsu.edu/alert4u/active-shooter.php.

“We want to direct students to the cards that they can carry as a reminder, but more importantly to the website where they can view the videos and read (the guidelines) in more detail,” said Sells, noting that such guidelines are not only applicable for college campuses, but for many other public spaces such as malls and other venues.

Starting next year, the cards will be given to all new freshmen during the CUSTOMS student orientation sessions held in summer before the start of classes. All new students are required to attend a CUSTOMS session.

At MTSU, alerts for an active shooter situation and other emergencies are sent via the university’s Critical Notification System, which is operated by Rave Mobile Safety and has almost 27,000 registered users. Emergency messages are distributed via texts, emails

and phone calls as well as posted to the university’s website and social media accounts.

While students, faculty and staff are automatically registered to receive Rave email alerts, only those who’ve added phone numbers to their notification preferences will also receive a text message and/or recorded phone call. All current MTSU students, faculty and staff can verify and update their Rave notification preferences by using their PipelineMT usernames and passwords at www.getrave.com/login/mtsu.

The campus community can also download the Rave Guardian app to their smartphones. The app includes a panic button feature that connects directly to police as well as a timer feature that allows users to designate police and/or family and friends as “guardians” who can remotely check on their status if traveling alone. Full details are available at http://www.mtsu.edu/alert4u/guardian.php.

Sells said the university will continue to reminds students, particularly incoming freshmen, that life on a college campus is much different than high school. That means, among other things, that students should take time to familiarize themselves with emergency protocols found on the university’s website and check their Rave registrations and preferences to ensure they receive emergency messages quickly.

Source: Cannon Courier

SERESA Offers Smart911 Services in Michigan

The Cities of Eastpointe, Roseville, and St. Clair Shores:

Public safety officseresa-logoials in the Cities of Eastpointe, Roseville, and St. Clair Shores announced today that Smart911 is now available to all individuals within the three cities. Smart911 is a free service available across the Country, which allows individuals and families to sign up online to provide key information to 9-1-1 call takers during an emergency.

Eastpointe City Manager and current SERESA Chairman Steve Duchane stated, “SERESA, as our tri-city collaborative, was quick to partner with Smart911.com as it represents the key objective, efficient effective service for our community of over 124,000 residents”

“Smart911 saves critical time in an emergency and has proven to save lives nationwide,” said SERESA Board member and Roseville Fire Chief Mike Holland, “The additional information provided in a Smart911 Safety Profile enables us to know exactly where we are going and who we are looking for in a house fire or at the scene of a vehicle accident, those details can help us respond faster and more efficiently.”

Smart911 allows citizens to create a Safety Profile at www.smart911.com for their household that includes any information they want 9-1-1 and response teams to have in the event of an emergency. When a citizen makes an emergency call, their Safety Profile is automatically displayed to the 9-1-1 call taker, allowing them to send the right response teams to the right location with the right information.

“Citizens that create a Safety Profile will be better prepared in all towns and county’s across the country that support Smat911,” stated Eastpointe Public Safety Director John McNeilance “The Safety Profile travels with you and the additional information provided allows us to send the right response teams faster.”

With Smart911, citizens can link both home and work addresses to mobile phones, which can be passed on to responders in the field for more a detailed, rapid response. Additional information including pets in the home, vehicle details in the event of an accident, and even emergency contacts can all be included in a Safety Profile. All information is optional and the citizen has the ability to choose what details they would like to include.

“The benefits of this information on a 9-1-1 call from a cell phone are immeasurable”, said SERESA Executive Director, Cherie Bartram, “Mobile phones do not provide an address to the 9-1-1 call taker. These emergency situations are often the worse of a person’s life and the Safety Profile can speak for you when you might be unable.”

Smart911 is currently available in 40 states and more than 1,500 municipalities across the country, and has been credited with positively impacting emergency outcomes including a missing child in which the girls photo and physical description were immediately available to 9-1-1 and responders, as well as a heart attack victim where an address and medical notes allowed responders to be dispatched to his location quickly.

Citizens are encouraged to create their Safety Profile with Smart911 today to have their information immediately available to 9-1-1 and to receive emergency notifications. Smart911 is private and secure, is only used for emergency responses, and only made available to the 9-1-1 system in the event of an emergency call.

For Additional Information Contact:

SERESA Executive Director Cherie Bartram cbartram@seresa.org

586-777-6700

https://www.smart911.com/

Rave Mobile Safety Honored as Gold Winner in 2016 Campus Technology Readers’ Choice Awards

campus-technologyRave Mobile Safety (Rave), a trusted partner for safety software protecting millions of individuals, was presented with a Gold Award in the second annual Campus Technology 2016 Readers’ Choice Awards. Rave was recognized for its Rave Alert solution, a campus safety emergency notification system trusted by more than 1,400 higher education institutions. Among two dozen choices for emergency notification services, readers recognized Rave Alert as award winning for its templates, multi-modal capabilities and integration of additional safety features.

The Campus Technology Readers’ Choice Awards recognizes outstanding contributions to education, from classroom instruction to IT systems and support. Education technology professionals voted for the software, hardware and services they consider most vital to the mission and business of higher education.

“Campus safety is a major undertaking for higher education institutions, and we’re constantly innovating to deliver product enhancements to our customers,” said Tom Axbey, chief executive officer at Rave Mobile Safety. “We’re honored to be selected for this year’s Gold Award and cocampustech_awardngratulate all the winners in this year’s competition.”

Rave Alert provides best-in-class, highly available emergency communications for enterprises, school districts, institutions and municipalities. Rave’s technology and products are used every day at more than 1,400 campuses, protecting more than 40 percent of the U.S. higher education population.

Campus Technology, published by 1105 Public Sector Media Group, announced the winners of the second annual Readers’ Choice Awards earlier this month, honoring the most-used and best-loved tech tools for colleges and universities. The awards provide a comprehensive view of the top products and brands that impact higher education today, honoring the best in learning management and e-learning, e-portfolios, student information systems, enterprise resource planning, network management, mobile device management and emergency notification services.

Further details about the Campus Technology Readers’ Choice Awards and its winners are available at http://www.CampusTechnology.com/ReadersChoice.

ISU Prepares In Wake Of Violence

After a violent attack on students at The Ohio State University, ISU prepares for the worse.

“It’s unlikely that it will happen at Indiana State, but it’s likely that it will happen some where so every University has to be prepared.” ISUPD Chief, Joe Newport told WTWO News Monday. “When ever you have college campuses that have some sort of violent action on them, everybody who is in charge of safety at universities, take a look at it.”

It didn’t take long for students to hear about the news.

“It’s a little bit scary just to know anything can happen on a college campus. You can be walking around and something like that will happen and you’ll never know. It’s really unexpected,” said student Ryan Gierman.

However it does help knowing the resources the university has.

“Any time something happens you get an email alert you can sign up for rave alert, it’s free. You’ll get an email alert immediately if something happens or if someone reports a crime even if it didn’t happen and they are not sure,” said Gierman.

Chief Newport says they watch for how the events unfold and how the school handles the incident to help prepare for the unthinkable.

Source: MyWabashValley

UAA Police Chief Addresses Campus Procedures

ANCHORAGE (KTUU) University Police Chief Brad Munn joined Channel 2 Monday evening to talk about how the University of Alaska Anchorage police department trains for and responds to potential incidents.

Munn also responded to questions before the live interview. Here is the video, and below, some of his responses, some combined for relevance and clarity:

What are some of the tactics UPD teaches or trains with for responding to an active shooter event?

Chief Munn: All UAA University Police Department officers are trained in active shooter response. We have in-house active shooter training once a semester so that we are prepared for these types of situations. Annually, we train with Anchorage Police and the FBI so that we are as prepared as possible.

For our university community we offer “Run. Hide. Fight.” training, which is focused on surviving an active shooter event. Training videos are available on our website.

How does the Police Department notify students and staff of an emergent threat or public safety concern?

Chief Munn: We use the Rave alert system. By activating Rave, we can send messages to the university community via text, email and phone, as well as to our institutional social media accounts.

These types of situations are based on the Clery Act, which requires campuses that receive federal funding to inform the public of crimes or emergencies on campus. The system is primarily used for Clery-reportable crimes. Those would be a serious and continuing threat to the university community such as a sexual assault, robbery, or vehicle thefts.

 

Source: KTUU

New 911 Ehancment Available for Natick

natick patchNATICK, MA — Should you ever need 911, now you’ll be ahead of the game.

Chief James G. Hicks and the Natick Police Department announced that a 911 enhancement called Smart911 is now available to all Natick residents and visitors.

Smart911 is a free service that allows individuals and families to sign up online to provide vital information to 911 call takers during an emergency. The Smart911 platform provides valuable new tools, and the information listed in safety profiles enables a faster more informed response, said an announcement.

“Smart911 has saved time and lives across the country,” Chief Hicks said in a statement. “The additional information in the safety profiles can provide 911 centers and first responders with lifesaving details. If we are responding to a house fire, or someone stranded on the road, those details can help us respond faster and more efficiently.”

Smart911 allows residents and travelers to create a safety profile at www.smart911.com that includes any information they might want 911 and first responders to have in the event of an emergency, such as allergy information or pre-existing medical conditions. When a citizen dials 911, their safety profile is automatically displayed to the 911 call taker, allowing us to send the appropriate responders to the right location with accurate information.

“911 calls made from a cell phone do not provide us with a location of the caller. The additional information provided through Smart911 on a call from a cell phone can provide call takers with addresses,” said Chief Hicks in a press release.

With Smart911, citizens can link both home and work addresses to mobile phones, which can be passed on to responders in the field for more a detailed and rapid response. Additional information including pets in the home, vehicle details in the event of an accident, and even emergency contacts can all be included in a user’s safety profile. All information is optional and the citizen has the ability to choose what details they would like to include.

Smart911 is currently available in 40 states and more than 1,500 municipalities across the country, continues the announcement. It has been credited with positively impacting emergency outcomes, including a severe heart attack victim where an address and medical notes allowed responders to be dispatched to his location quickly. In another incident when a child went missing, a current photo and physical description were immediately available and police found the child in less than 15 minutes.

Citizens are encouraged to create their safety profile with Smart911 today to have their information immediately available to 911 and to receive emergency notifications. Smart911 is private and secure, is only used for emergency responses, and only made available to the 911 system in the event of an emergency call.

Information submitted by Natick Police Department

This article was originally posted here. 

Smart911 Now Available in Natick

Residents and Travelers Encouraged to Create Safety Profile to be Better Prepared for Emergencies

natick-patchNATICK — Chief James G. Hicks and the Natick Police Department are pleased to announce that a 911 enhancement called Smart911 is now available to all Natick residents and visitors. Smart911 is a free service that allows individuals and families to sign up online to provide vital information to 911 call takers during an emergency. The Smart911 platform provides valuable new tools, and the information listed in safety profiles enables a faster more informed response.

“Smart911 has saved time and lives across the country,” Chief Hicks said. “The additional information in the safety profiles can provide 911 centers and first responders with lifesaving details. If we are responding to a house fire, or someone stranded on the road, those details can help us respond faster and more efficiently.”

Smart911 allows residents and travelers to create a safety profile at www.smart911.com for their whole household that includes any information they might want 911 and first responders to have in the event of an emergency, such as allergy information or pre-existing medical conditions. When a citizen dials 911, their safety profile is automatically displayed to the 911 call taker, allowing us to send the appropriate responders to the right location with accurate information.

“911 calls made from a cell phone do not provide us with a location of the caller. The additional information provided through Smart911 on a call from a cell phone can provide call takers with addresses,” said Chief Hicks.

With Smart911, citizens can link both home and work addresses to mobile phones, which can be passed on to responders in the field for more a detailed and rapid response. Additional information including pets in the home, vehicle details in the event of an accident, and even emergency contacts can all be included in a user’s safety profile. All information is optional and the citizen has the ability to choose what details they would like to include.

Smart911 is currently available in 40 states and more than 1,500 municipalities across the country. It has been credited with positively impacting emergency outcomes, including a severe heart attack victim where an address and medical notes allowed responders to be dispatched to his location quickly. In another incident when a child went missing, a current photo and physical description were immediately available and police found the child in less than 15 minutes.

Citizens are encouraged to create their safety profile with Smart911 today to have their information immediately available to 911 and to receive emergency notifications. Smart911 is private and secure, is only used for emergency responses, and only made available to the 911 system in the event of an emergency call.

Contact: John Guilfoil Phone: 617-993-0003 Email: john@jgpr.net

 

Originally posted here.

UALR Uses App To Warn Students Of Active Shooter

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (KTHV) — Across the Ohio State campus in Columbus, authorities urged students to follow three rules: run, hide, fight.  It is a mantra security experts are installing in schools and universities across the country, including right here in Arkansas.

All universities in central Arkansas have some protocol in place. At the University of Arkansas at Little Rock, they also use the phrase run, hide, and fight.  But an app called “RAVE” allows students to make contact with campus police during any actual shooting or other emergency.  While most students have it downloaded, they hope never to have to use it.

UALR Assistant Chief of Investigation Rommel Benjamin is urging students to download the RAVE app so they can immediately get alerted if there’s an active shooting or other emergency.

“If an active shooter is on the campus and if they are on the RAVE system, we can alert them by their cell phone and email and over the telephone system,” Benjamin said.

It would also tell students and faculty where the incident is taking place and what areas to stay away from.

“If they see the person they can give us a description of what the person looks like or what type of weapon they have,” Benjamin said.

It would also help police as they look for suspects who may have accessed the campus.  30 campus police officers are trained by the FBI and local police on how to control, assist, and defuse an active shooting.

“Generally, we do an active shooting video which is just a demonstration, and then we talk about it and answer questions,” Benjamin said.

When students receive an alert of an active shooter on campus, doors will automatically lock.  If students are located inside a room with an automatic lock police, say they can use everyday items like belts, ties, and jacket to wrap around the door’s hinges or if possible they can manually lock the door.

Mariah Peterson is a freshman at UALR and situations like that at Ohio State have her on high alert.

“Whenever I do get on my social media and hear about things like the Ohio State incident, it makes me start to think,” said Peterson.  “So, maybe like today I won’t feel as safe as normal.”

Students said the problem is they’re unfamiliar with what to do during an active shooting, often calling local police instead of campus police.  But police say everything needed is in the app.

“So the key is RAVE alert,” Benjamin said.

Source: KTHV

Smart911: Saving lives, one phone call at a time

Lt. Governor Brian Calley is a guest blogger and originally posted here.

Imagine an emergency situation where you need help urgently. Wouldn’t you want 911 operators to have as much information as possible to help rescue you?

Our 911 operators all across Michigan do amazing work but the added use of cell phones instead of land lines sometimes makes it more difficult to pinpoint someone’s location in an emergency. In a situation where every minute counts, enhancing our 911 systems can save lives and the state of Michigan is taking action to give our communities resources to do that.

michiganlaunch_1

 

LG Calley was in Mt. Clemens today announcing the availability of Smart 911 service to all dispatch centers across Michigan for a year. Enhanced 911 was a recommendation of the Mental Health and Wellness Commission, which Calley chaired, with the initial goal of helping dispatchers know about mental health or disability issues in an emergency. Smart 911 services are available thanks to $2.2 million in funding that is within the Fiscal Year 2017 budget.

Smart911 allows dispatchers to see a safety profile when a resident calls 911. These voluntary and free profiles can include anything from pictures of family members, to a residential address, to any existing medical conditions to be aware of. Individuals get to choose how much they want to include on their profile, and the information is only available to dispatchers and first responders when a 9–1–1 call is made. Smart 911 also has a feature that allows dispatchers to initiate text conversations with anyone who calls 9–1–1 from a mobile phone.

There are 144 dispatch centers in Michigan and 32 of them already implement this valuable addition to their 911 service. Under the funding LG Calley announced today, the remaining centers will now have the ability to try out Smart 911 for the year with the state covering the cost.

“In emergency situations, every minute counts and enhancing 911 services across our state is essential to protecting the lives of Michiganders,” Calley said.

That’s exactly what happened to Dan Hoffman of Traverse City who spoke at Monday’s event. Dan called 911 after waking up from a nap in a room engulfed in flames. Dan called 911 but couldn’t speak due to the smoke. Dispatchers were struggling to find his home through traditional methods, but his wife had filled out a Smart 911 profile and dispatchers were able to send out first responders directly to his home address on the profile. Without Smart 911, Dan may not have made it out of his home alive.

As Americans, we are lucky to live in a country where help for those in dire need is just a phone call away. As Michiganders, we are lucky to live in a state where there is room for the growth of a statewide enhanced 9–1–1 system. At its core, Smart911 provides hope. Because of this service, there will be less risk to the first responders who have dedicated their lives to helping the rest of us. Because of this service, there will be even more people all across the state who are saved.

For more information visit www.smart911.com.

Smart911 To Become Available Statewide

MICHIGAN (WPBN/WGTU) — A tool that provides authorities with important data that citizens voluntarily provide in the event of a 911 call will soon be available statewide.

Smart911, a program by Rave Mobility, announced Tuesday its initiative to make Smart911 available to all Michigan residents.

Smart911 is described on Rave Mobile Safety website as “a comprehensive software program that facilitates data and communications in the event of a 9-1-1 call. With Smart911, Michiganders can create an extensive online profile, which displays to dispatchers when a 9-1-1 call is made. Critical information such as home address, bedroom location, pet information, medical details and whether households include people with dementia or children with autism can all be provided and can improve response.”

“If you dial 911 from your cell phone, it’s going to ping a location where you’re at, a general location,” said Jerry Wojtankowski, firefighter and paramedic with Traverse City Fire Department.

Sometimes the general location isn’t good enough when it comes to an emergency.

That’s why the program Smart911 is useful to first responders.

“We typically benefit from additional information that we get from emergency runs and a lot of that has to do with allergies or chronic medical conditions,” said Matt Ansorge, Leelanau County Director of Emergency Management.

“In emergency situations, every minute counts and enhancing 9-1-1 services across our state is essential to protecting the lives of Michiganders,” said Brian Calley, Lt. Governor of Michigan. “Services like Smart911 help us advance the tools that our dispatchers can use to help save lives on a daily basis. State funding will help communities across our state take advantage of this program and have extra resources to help save lives in emergencies.”

captureSmart911 is currently available across portions of 43 states and thousands of municipalities across the country, and has been credited with positively impacting countless emergency situations.

Rave Mobility along with state funds are making the program available to all Michigan resident, but counties have to opt in.

Grand Traverse County was the first county in Michigan to use Smart911.

“It’s going to be free for at least the first year,” said Ansorge. “After that, it may be a year-to-year commitment. We’re not sure how that’s all going to work out at the state level.”

You can sign up with Smart911 for free on your smart phone or on a computer and enter things like your home address, medical details, family and pets.

Two years ago, a Grand Traverse County man was saved from a burning house. Dispatchers said Smart911 gave first responders critical information that helped save his life.

“I’m able to hug my kids every day because of it now,” said Dan Hoffman who survived a house fire. “I have a lot of respect for these guys and what they do.”

“En route, it also gives us time to think and plan what we’re going to do for our means of treatment before we get on scene if it’s a possible diabetic or somebody with heart problems,” said Wojtanowski.

Smart911 is a nationwide program. If you sign up for it, your profile will follow you any place using the system, which Ansorge said will be beneficial with tourists in the area.

“The profile, when they call 911, is only active for a certain amount of time then after that it goes away,” said Ansorge. “It will be long enough for us to able to reference that information during the normal execution of a call.”

Leelanau County is hoping to have the Smart911 program up at running by the beginning of December.

To sign up for Smart911, CLICK HERE.

 

This article was originally posted here.

NCCPD Introduces ‘Rave Panic Button’ To Area Agencies

Smart Phone App Designed to Improve First Responder Conditions

 

11822650_866718573382201_5369003869204852251_nA new program introduced by New Castle County Police will give first responders a clearer picture of what kind of situation they’re walking into.

At a press conference on Tuesday, New Castle County Chief of Emergency Communications Jeffrey Miller introduced the Rave Panic Button app, currently being used in conjunction with several area agencies and school districts.

The app, which connects directly to the 911 Fusion Center in New Castle, gives responders access to floorplans, remote cameras, and other pertinent information when responding to an active public safety situation.

“The solution instantly dials 9-1-1 while simultaneously immediately alerting on-site personnel of the emergency and opening up a communication channel between responders and others involved in the incident,” Miller said of the app.

Users hold down the virtual button for 1.5 seconds before it activates, Miller said. It then connects to 911, while the additional information comes into the Fusion Center.

The app is currently being used by a number of area agencies and businesses, including Concord Mall, the Jewish American Center in Wilmington, and the Red Clay Consolidated School District.

Only those authorized to use the app can initiate a call response, Miller said, and the department does not have random access to any cameras linked to the system.

“We can’t hit a button and see out,” he said. “The caller has to initiate the connection.”

County Police Chief Elmer Setting said that the new program, coupled with the Targeted Analytical Policing System and the Smart 911 Fusion Call Center, puts the department at the forefront of hi-tech policing.

“We’re cutting edge, technology-wise,” Setting said. “This could save a lot of lives. The old way of doing this is, ‘hey there’s an emergency, throw all the resources at it,’ not knowing what we need … now we’re going to know that.”

“Anytime that you can get better coordination and more information on a situation you’re going into, it’s helpful,” said Emergency Medical Services commander Lawrence Tan. “The ability to get live information, not just from the caller, but also from cameras that provides awareness is a big benefit.”

The program is part of incumbent County Executive Tom Gordon’s initiative to bring hi-tech policing to New Castle County.

“Now all response units have more information and enhanced communication to arrive on scene faster to help those in need,” Gordon said.

On Thursday, the NCCPD released information on CrimeMapping.com, a free public website that allows police agencies from across the United States to upload their own crime-data so that it can be mapped.

According to a press release, the website provides the public with an easy-to-use tool to view crime information in their communities. The interactive website will allow residents to review crime as well as submit tips in an effort to increase community involvement in investigations.

The website also has the option for citizens to sign up and receive crime alerts.

For more information on the Rave Panic Button, visit ravepanicbutton.com.

Source: Community News

Smart911 Coming to Macomb County

No-cost upgraded service allows residents to give helpful information ahead of time to emergency services.

Macomb County will get Smart 911 beginning next year. This will allow faster and safer response times from first responders, officials said Monday at a news conference.

Residents who sign up for the Smart 911 service can pre-load information on their families, special needs, medication and number of pets in a household. That information will be made available to emergency dispatchers when 911 is called, Macomb Daily News is reporting.

firetruck_emergency_shutterstock_195492479-1479243771-6977“First responders will go into households knowing more about the challenges and happenings and circumstances about that household,” said Lt. Gov. Brian Calley at the Macomb County Communications and Technology Center (COMTEC). “It will save time with a higher degree of efficiency.”

The upgraded 911 system will be a cellular-based emergency system. Smart 911 calls will be routed using geographic coordinates, so dispatchers will automatically be able to see the caller’s location and whether they are calling from a moving vehicle or stationary position.

Dan Hoffman, a laborer from the Traverse City area, was present at the news conference. He said his life was saved after dispatchers used his Smart 911 profile to locate him when his house caught fire in 2014. Unable to speak when he called 911, and dispatchers used his Smart 911 profile to identify his address information, which saved 11 minutes in response time for firefighters.

“When EMS showed up, they realized there was a fire in my house and broke down the door and dragged me out,” Hoffman said. “My house was 3-4 minutes from a flashover. The technology saved my life.”

Todd Piett, chief product officers for Rave Mobile Safety, the administrator of Smart 911, said residents can sign up for the service at Smart911.com at no cost. Residents can enter their exact address along with other information that will be helpful to first responders in emergencies.

People signing up for the service can enter information ranging from medical condition, medications, photos of their children or pets, what doors may be open and other useful details, Piett said. The hearing disabled can also text the information.

That way, police or firefighters responding to an emergency call will have advance knowledge of special circumstances they may encounter one on scene.

“The information will only pop up if you call 911,” Piett added.

Michigan has $2.2 million allocated in grants as seed money to get the service up and running in all 83 counties, according to Republican state Sen. Margaret O’Brien of Portage. Macomb County expects to receive $14,000.

From there, county officials expect to pick up the annual operational cost, which is anticipated to remain roughly the same, said Macomb County Executive Mark Hackel.

Hackel, a former county sheriff who started his law enforcement career as a dispatcher, said the technology and information enhancements allow first responders to “do what we can do better and quicker.”

Capt. Monica Yesh of the Michigan State Police said Macomb County is one of the state leaders in technology, so the service will fit in with that mission.

“Any tool we can get to enhance our ability to provide our service to the public is so welcome,” she said. “If we can get information ahead of time to help us where we need to go, I think it’s excellent technology.”

Photo via Shutterstock

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Rave Panic Button: Protecting the Public in New Castle County

12376185_10153829629092232_40363499617035822_nSchools, malls and hospitals in New Castle County now have a better way to contact police in an emergency. NBC10 Delaware Bureau Reporter Tim Furlong has the details on the new app that can save lives with the push of a button. In seconds, Rave Panic Button clearly communicates an emergency to 9-1-1, on-site personnel, and first responders.
To learn more visit: www.ravemobilesafety.com/panic-button

The New Smart911 Service Coming to Every Michigan Dispatch Center in 2017

– The state is rolling out funding next year to bring a state-of-the-art 911 service to all neighborhoods in Michigan.

The service is called Smart911, and it’s already been implemented in 32 of the state’s 144 dispatch centers.

“We believe that all citizens across the state deserve access to this technology,” Lt. Gov. Brian Calley said at the Macomb County Communications and Technology Center Monday when announcing the funding. About $2 million has been set aside in the state’s 2017 budget for the technology.

Most 911 calls nowadays are made from cell phones, which don’t provide an address to the dispatch center. So, Smart911 is a system that helps provide basic background information to dispatchers that can help speed up response time.

HOW SMART911 WORKS

Residents create a free profile with Smart911 that includes details about everyone in their home, from family member descriptions to medical conditions. You can even include your pets in your household profile so they don’t get overlooked.

Then, if you ever have to call 911, the dispatcher can see the information registered with your phone number(s) and will be more equipped to help you.

You can learn more about Smart911 or sign up for your own Smart 911 account at www.smart911.com.

The State of Michigan is working with Rave Mobile Safety to expand the Smart 911 service program.

Read the full story Here