Pulaski County is the third locality in Virginia to launch Smart911

PULASKI (WSLS 10) – Pulaski County unveiled a new program that will save first responders time during emergencies and could help save lives.

It is called Smart911. Using this system, people can create their own safety profile, which includes things like medical history, family member contact information, entry ways into your home and even pet information.

Smart911 is running in conjunction with the county’s new alert system.

Pulaski County is the third locality in Virginia to implement the program. There are about 1,500 places that have it across the country.

Pulaski County launches enhanced 911 service called “Smart 911”

In Pulaski County, a new service is being offered to people so first responders can better help them in times of emergency. The “Smart 911” service will help them help citizens more efficiently.

When the 9-1-1 operator gets a call,  their job is to help.  They work to get all the necessary information, but sometimes they may not get enough.

Now, the Joint 911 Communications Center has a new system in place called “Smart 911”.

“Citizens can sign up through with that they create their own profile. Their allergies, medical conditions. Their pets, their children,” said Brad Nester, deputy director of the Pulaski County Joint 911 Center.

Nester says people can put as much or a little information as they want.  The profile only pops up when someone dials 911, and operators only provide the information to the appropriate first responders.

“We can get information to the responders more quickly,” said Nester.

Nester says the system has been implemented in 1500 municipalities across the county.  He says Pulaski County’s system  is the first in the Southwest Virginia.  He  says a person’s profile will pop up in any jurisdiction that uses the system.

“If you were at the beach on vacation and you called 911 your cell phone. It would show hey it’s John Doe from Pulaski,Virginia,” said Nester.

He says previously if someone called 9-1-1, and then hung up they most likely wouldn’t be able to get in contact with the person again.

“With this software we can initiate a caller and have a two-way conversation,” said Nester.

It’s a conversation people in Pulaski County say they are glad they can have.

Click here to create a “Smart 911” profile.

Smart911 Now Live in Wyoming County

Smart911 now live in Wyoming County

9-20-16

On behalf of Wyoming County we are proud to be here today as we take a step forward in enhancing our 9-1-1 and emergency response capabilities for all residents.

Wyoming County is pleased to announce that we have implemented a new system to improve 9-1-1 services for all citizens.  Smart911 is a service which will allow all residents and visitors in Wyoming County to provide information about themselves and their family to 9-1-1 prior to an emergency.  This private and secure Safety Profile will display automatically to the 9-1-1 call taker immediately when a citizens dials 9-1-1.  Call takers and emergency responders can now be provided vital personal and medical information to help understand and respond to an emergency faster and with more detail.
Smart911 is free, private and secure.   In addition it is a national database, when you dial 9-1-1 from any location in the US that support Smart911 your Safety Profile will be immediately available to those 9-1-1 call takers.
 
 Again, all citizens can visit www.smart911.com  at any time to create their FREE Safety Profile, and we encourage you to do so today.
Wyoming County is pleased to announce that we have implemented a new system to improve 9-1-1 services for all citizens.  Smart911 is a service which will allow all residents and visitors in Wyoming County to provide information about themselves and their family to 9-1-1 prior to an emergency.  This private and secure Safety Profile will display automatically to the 9-1-1 call taker immediately when a citizens dials 9-1-1.  Call takers and emergency responders can now be provided vital personal and medical information to help understand and respond to an emergency faster and with more detail.
Click Here for full Story

Wyoming County Announces Smart911 to Help Save Lives

Public Safety Officials Encourage All Residents to Sign Up For the Free Service That Better Protects Residents in an Emergency

 

Wyoming PA LogoWYOMING Co., PA, August 31, 2016 – Residents of the Wyoming County can now sign up for a new safety initiative, Smart911, which is available to all individuals.  Smart911 is a free service that allows individuals and families to sign up online and provide key information to 9-1-1 centers. This information enables faster and more effective emergency response by law enforcement, fire, and emergency medical services.

“The Smart911 Safety Profiles can save critical time in an emergency when seconds can be the difference between life and death,” said Jeff Porter, 911 Director.  “The additional function of the Smart911 platform helps us respond faster and more efficiently.”

Smart911 enables residents to create a Safety Profile at www.smart911.com for their entire household. Residents can customize their profile and share any information they want 9-1-1 and response teams to have in the event of an emergency. All information in the Safety Profile is private and secure, and it is seen only when the resident dials 9-1-1. When a resident makes an emergency call, their Safety Profile is automatically displayed to the 9-1-1 call taker, allowing them to send the right response teams to the right location with the right information.

“The benefits of this information on a 9-1-1 call from a cell phone are immeasurable”, said Jeff Porter,911 Director ,“Mobile phones do not provide an address to the 9-1-1 call taker. In situations like a house fire, seconds matter and the additional information with the Smart911 platform enables help to arrive faster.”

Smart911 provides 9-1-1 call takers with improved data and communications on each mobile call. When a 9-1-1 call comes in, the 9-1-1 call could display a Safety Profile about the caller and a Facility Profile about the location they are in.  Additionally the 9-1-1 call taker can send an outbound SMS text message to mobile phone callers who cannot safely communicate.

Smart911 is currently available in 40 states and more than 1,500 municipalities across the country, and has been credited with positively impacting emergency outcomes including a missing child in which the girls photo and physical description were immediately available to 9-1-1 and responders, as well as a heart attack victim where an address and medical notes allowed responders to be dispatched to his location quickly.

Citizens are encouraged to create their Safety Profile with Smart911 today to have their information immediately available to 9-1-1 and first responders. Smart911 is private and secure, is only used for emergency responses, and only made available to the 9-1-1 system in the event of an emergency call.

Contact:

Jeff Porter, 911 Director

Wyoming County 911

(570) 836-7524

Mill Creek Schools Get ‘Smart911’ and Rave Panic Button

The Mill Creek Police Department this week announced implementation of the use of the Rave Panic Button for schools located in the city of Mill Creek.

The Rave Panic Button is a phone app providing communication abilities between school staff and emergency service agencies during school emergencies.10151226_630474827035588_5126552728124176977_n

When an emergency call is made from the Rave Panic Button app, on-site school personnel are notified of the emergency, and the caller is immediately connected to the SNOCOM 9-1-1 center where SNOCOM is provided information about the type of emergency and critical information about the campus.

Key situational information, such as caller location, building floor plan
s, campus contact and access info, is immediately available as is the ability to rapidly message campus employees and first responders.

The City has collaborated with the Everett Public Schools and SNOCOM (Mill Creek’s Police Dispatch Center) to bring this important service to Mill Creek area schools.

City Manager Rebecca Polizzotto thanked the local parent teacher organizations for bringing this concern to her attention.

“By working together as a community, we have been able to implement a service that enhances the safety of all of our children,” Polizzotto said.

Everett Public Schools in Mill Creek – Jackson High School, Heatherwood Middle School and Mill Creek Elementary – were the only district schools not equipped to operate the Rave Panic Button.

Key members of those schools’ PTSAs contacted the city manager last year to see what could be done to have the program implemented in Mill Creek.

City leaders worked with district leadership and SNOCOM, and were able to work through the process to implement the program.

Mayor Pam Pruitt and Police Chief Greg Elwin are the City’s representatives to the SNOCOM board, and advocated for this program on behalf of Mill Creek.

“Southwest Snohomish County is better served having the ‘Smart 911’ in place, and the children at our Mill Creek schools are safer as a result of the Rave Panic Button introduction,” Mayor Pruitt said.

“I am pleased to enhance our school resource officer program with introduction of this technology,” Chief Elwin said.

Staff from the district, the dispatch center and the police department will be trained in the operation of the Rave Panic Button.

millcreek.com

WEA & IPAWS – What is it and What Does it Mean to You?

The recent manhunt in New York and New Jersey highlighted the use of Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEA) as an effective means of broadcasting critical messages. At about 8 a.m. on Monday September 19, New Yorkers received a notification informing them of a suspect wanted for questioning about terrorist bombings over the weekend. The message gave the name, age and asked people to watch the media for a picture and call 911 if they saw him. He was subsequently apprehended in NJ.  So how exactly were these messages pushed to so many people so quickly?  WEA.

What is WEA?  FEMA provides answers to frequently asked questions here.  It is essentially an interface to a wireless alerting service that wireless carriers have deployed across most of the country.  These wireless alerts will “relay Presidential, AMBER, and Imminent Threat alerts to mobile phones using cell broadcast technology that will not get backlogged during times of emergency when wireless voice and data services are highly congested.”  Unfortunately, I continue to hear a number of misconceptions about the service perpetuated throughout the emergency management community, especially in terms of its relationship and overlap with existing emergency notification systems.  Let’s look at a few facts about the service.

It delivers text messages to mobile phones but not via SMS.  WEA alerts (formerly knows as CMAS for those who have heard that term) are delivered using a special protocol optimized around one-to-many message delivery to handsets communicating with targeted wireless towers.  When sending the alerts regions are targeted, and mobile handsets supporting the technology that are speaking with the cellular tower sectors covering the targeted area will receive the messages (if you are really curious, you can read more about cell sectors here).  These emergency alerts have a unique ring tone and vibration.  Alerts will automatically “pop up” on the mobile device screen and will be limited to 90 characters.  In the case of my device the alerts actually show up in my SMS messaging in-box and are visually differentiated with an alert icon.  See the screen shot below:

It is only intended for urgent communications. The FCC’s rules for use of WEA are covered under 47 CFR 10.  There are three classes of Alert Messages: Presidential Alert; Imminent Threat Alert; and Child Abduction Emergency/AMBER Alert.  Presidential Alerts are issued by the President.  AMBER Alerts can only be initiated by local government officials based on five specific Department of Justice activation criteria. Imminent threat criteria are based on Common Alerting Protocol (CAP) definitions.  The urgency level of imminent threats must be either Immediate ( i.e. , responsive action should be taken immediately) or Expected ( i.e. , responsive action should be taken soon, within the next hour); the severity level must be either Extreme ( i.e. , an extraordinary threat to life or property) or Severe ( i.e. , a significant threat to life or property); and the certainty level must be either Observed ( i.e. , determined to have occurred or to be ongoing) or Likely ( i.e. , has a probability of greater than 50 percent).  In other words, this is really not meant for warnings about pending snow storms or localized street flooding

The ability to send these alerts is not widely delegated.  Quoting FEMA, “Imminent Threat alerts may be issued by state and local officials who have completed a four-step application process and executed a Memorandum of Agreement with FEMA governing system security.”  An important aspect of WEA is limiting the potential for abuse.  Given the criteria required for notifications and their regional impact, use of WEA is not currently delegated down to some of the biggest users of existing emergency notification systems:  colleges and universities, K-12 school districts, and corporate campuses. In order to become an alert originator, an agency must apply through regional coordinators to FEMA. The notifications are actually sent through a solution, such as Rave Alert, which has been granted access to the Integrated Public Alert & Warning System (IPAWS).

Improvements on the way. Both the FCC and FEMA have recently been soliciting comments about the next phase of improvements for WEA. Specifically, they are actively looking at ways to improve the granularity of location targeting (an entire cell sector can be a very large area) and identifying ways to delegate authority to send WEA messages down to other types of safety agencies and support a broader spectrum of scenarios.

Wireless Emergency Alerts are a powerful tool to enhance public safety.  It’s been many years in the making and the coordination between technology providers and public safety agencies in defining the standards has been a herculean effort.  I’m excited to see it working its way into operational procedures and assisting in improving our safety.

Really curious about the technology and how it works?  Watch a 30-minute in-depth view of the the differences between SMS and WEA here.

Pulaski County Announces Enhanced 9-1-1 Service with Smart911

PULASKI COUNTY

JOINT 9-1-1 COMMUNICATIONS CENTER

802 EAST MAIN STREET PULASKI, VA 24301

 

Public Safety Officials Encourage Residents to Sign Up for the Free Service to Be Better Prepared for an Emergency

Public safety officials in the CouPulaski Sealnty of Pulaski are excited to announce that Smart911+ Alert is now available to all individuals and families. Smart911 is a free service that allows individuals to create a Safety Profile for their household. Profiles can include any information they may want 9-1-1 call takers and first responders to have in the event of an emergency, then if they need to dial 9-1-1 their Safety Profile will immediately display on the call taker’s screen, saving critical seconds and even minutes in response time. Coupled with Rave Alert individuals can receive notifications on potentially hazardous situations involving weather, traffic and other emergencies.

“Smart911 has helped save lives and positively impact emergency situations nationwide,” said 9-1-1 Executive Director Chris Akers. “The key information provided in a Smart911 Safety Profile enables us to know exactly where we are going and who we are looking for. Sending notifications through Rave Alert allows us to keep the public informed of emergencies and how to be prepared and stay safe.”

Smart911 allows individuals to create a Safety Profile at www.smart911.com for their entire household that includes as much or as little information they want 9-1-1 and response teams to know. Their Safety Profile is only displayed to the 9-1-1 call takers when individuals dial 9-1-1 and allows them to send the right response teams to the right location with the right information. Responders can be aware of many details they would not have known previously. Now, fire crews can arrive at a house fire knowing how many people live in the home and the location of bedrooms, EMS can be advised of allergies or specific medical conditions and police can have the photo of a missing child in seconds rather than minutes or hours.

Individuals can also opt-in for Rave Alert which allows citizens to receive timely and actionable emergency alerts via email, text or voice message on their cell phones. Individuals decide how much information they want to provide when they sign up and it is stored on the Smart911 secure online system. They can also identify when and how they are alerted and communicated with before, during, and after emergencies.

“Citizens will receive notifications that will improve safety in our county and help inform residents of potentially lifesaving actions they may need to take in an emergency,” said Executive Director Akers. “The information in Smart911 Safety Profiles and the emergency notifications allows both residents and first responders to be better informed in an emergency situation.”

With Smart911 and Alert the community is more aware and better prepared in the event of an emergency. Smart911 enables citizens to link both home and work addresses to mobile phones, which can be passed on to responders in the field for more a detailed, rapid response. All information is optional and the citizen has the ability to choose what details they would like to include.

Smart911 is currently available in 40 states and more than 1,500 municipalities across the country, and has been credited with positively impacting emergency outcomes including a missing child in which the girls photo and physical description were immediately available to 9-1-1 and responders, as well as a heart attack victim where an address and medical notes allowed responders to be dispatched to his location quickly.

Contact:

Bradley D. Nester – Deputy Director 540-440-0367 | 540-980-7800 | E-mail: bnester@pcva911.org

Preventing Healthcare Workplace Violence

Working in healthcare almost guarantees you will experience workplace violence in your career.

The statistics are staggering:

  • 75% of all workplace assaults between 2011 and 2013 happened in healthcare settings.
  • Hospital employees victimized by violence on the job are forced to take time away from work at a rate that’s five times higher than workers in other occupations.
  • 78% of emergency department physicians nationwide report being the target of workplace violence in the past year

In California, Cal OSHA recognized the growing trend of violence in healthcare, and proposed sweeping regulations. The regulations require every healthcare employer to create a Workplace Violence Prevention Plan and alarm or other similar system.

Please join us for a 30-minute webinar on September 22nd about the current state of Cal OSHA’s proposed ruling. We’ll also show you how Rave’s Panic Button app can help protect all your employees while addressing Cal OSHA requirements.

Introducing Smart911 to Clark County

CRESA has recently begun working on introducing Smart 911 for Clark County.  As CRESA works behind the scenes to bring this service for residents of Clark County, it’s not too early for you to do your part and create your Safety Profile. VisitSmart911.com and start your Safety Profile today!

What is Smart911?

Smart 911 is a service that allows residents to create a free Safety Profile for their household that includes any information they want 9-1-1 and first responders to have in the event of an emergency.  Then, when anyone in that household dials 9-1-1, from a phone associated with their Safety Profile their profile is immediately displayed to the 9-1-1 call taker providing additional information that can be used to facilitate the proper response to the proper location.  At a time when seconds count, Smart911 provides details that could impact response the second an emergency call is placed.  which could be the difference between life and death.

How Can I sign up?

You can sign up for Smart911 at Smart911.com and create a Safety Profile for your household to give 9-1-1 valuable information about yourself, family members, your home, pets and even vehicles that will display automatically on the 9-1-1 call takers’s screen when you make an emergency call.  It’s private, and secure and you control what information is in your profile.  These details can save seconds or even minutes during an emergency.

How Does Smart911 Help?

Medical Conditions:  For individuals who are affected by epilepsy, diabetes, Alzheimer’s, allergies or other medical conditions, Smart911 can inform responders of their conditions as well as medications and emergency contacts.

For full Story visit Nextdoor.com

CRESA Introduces Smart 911 for Clark County

CRESA has recently begun working on introducing Smart 911 for Clark County.  As CRESA works behind the scenes to bring this service for residents of Clark County, it’s not too early for you to do your part and create your Safety Profile. Visit Smart911.com and start your Safety Profile today!

What is Smart911?

Smart 911 is a service that allows residents to create a free Safety Profile for their household that includes any information they want 9-1-1 and first responders to have in the event of an emergency.  Then, when anyone in that household dials 9-1-1, from a phone associated with their Safety Profile their profile is immediately displayed to the 9-1-1 call taker providing additional information that can be used to facilitate the proper response to the proper location.  At a time when seconds count, Smart911 provides details that could impact response the second an emergency call is placed.  which could be the difference between life and death.

How Can I sign up?You can sign up for Smart911 at Smart911.com and create a Safety Profile for your household to give 9-1-1 valuable information about yourself, family members, your home, pets and even vehicles that will display automatically on the 9-1-1 call takers’s screen when you make an emergency call.  It’s private, and secure and you control what information is in your profile.  These details can save seconds or even minutes during an emergency.

How Does Smart911 Help?

Medical Conditions:  For individuals who are affected by epilepsy, diabetes, Alzheimer’s, allergies or other medical conditions, Smart911 can inform responders of their conditions as well as medications and emergency contacts.

Senior and Elderly Care:  For active seniors, a Safety Profile can provide peace of mind that in the event of an emergency 9-1-1 would have details on their home, and medical needs.  For caretakers, they can be assured that if the person they care for needs to dial 9-1-1 when they are alone, their details are available and the caretaker can be listed as an emergency contact.

General Emergencies:  For all individuals, there is always a risk of unplanned accidents or events.  Whether in a vehicle or in your home, even the most basic details such as the address association with a mobile phone can be available to 9-1-1 and response teams to send help fast.

Physical Disabilities: For those who have a physical disability or mobility restrictions, it is vital for responders to know about the person, their disability and what type of assistance or special equipment they may need to evacuate their home or receive transport.

Pets and Service Animals:  For individuals with pets or other animals your Safety Profile can alert police to their presence when entering your home and Fire crews can be aware of exactly how many people and pets need to be evacuated from your home.  For owners of a service animal, you can alert responders that your animal needs to be transported with you.

Local Dispatch Center Rolls Out Smart911 Program

A new service, provided by local dispatch, is available to Cache Valley residents who find themselves calling 911 with an emergency.

Smart911 is a web-based platform that can save critical time in an emergency when seconds can be the difference between life and death.
The program gives users the option of creating a profile that gives dispatchers additional pieces of information that might be helpful in an emergency.HJ News

For example, Shelley Peterson, director of Logan City Police Department Communications Division, said she herself has noted the location of a large propane tank on her property in case there is a fire at her home.

Dispatchers say they received a call from someone last week who noted multiple family members with severe bee allergies. If the 911 caller is having a severe reaction and is unable to speak but can make the call, the dispatcher has this information and can alert medical responders, Peterson said.
“The information is only available when a 911 call is placed. It is not searchable, it is private and secure and it is only used when someone calls 911,” Peterson said.

The program also provides an option to indicate that a member of the household is at risk for domestic violence, and gives dispatchers the option of sending an SMS text message if the 911 call is disconnected.

While this is not a true 911 texting service, it does give the end user a way to communicate even when it is not safe to relay information verbally, Peterson said.

Back when landline telephones were the norm, they provided a valuable link between the person calling 911 with an emergency and the dispatcher sending help — one phone number was connected with a specific street address.

Now, more and more people have eliminated their landline telephones in favor of cell phones, giving people the means to make 911 calls directly from the scene of the emergency anywhere they have a signal.
However, that mobility means there is no telling where the calls will be made or which tower will relay the call or even which dispatch center will receive your call for help.

Now, every person who sets up Smart911 a profile can provide an address, additional household phone numbers, emergency contacts, even the names, ages and descriptions of others in the home.

Profiles might also include a photo of each household member that can be used in a search for victims in an event such as a house fire — if a person wishes to provide that information.

The Logan dispatch center pays $9,000 per year for this program, which is funded by the 911 taxes collected by phone companies.

There is no additional cost to the user, it is simple to navigate, and once it is set up, you simply need to sign in every six months or so, just so dispatchers know they are working with current information. To learn more or to sign up, visit
https://smart911.com/

Logan, Utah Residents Now Have Smart911

A new service is available to Cache Valley, Utah residents who find themselves calling 911 with an emergency.

Smart911 is a web-based platform that can save critical time in an emergency when seconds can be the difference between life and death.

The program gives users the option of creating a profile that gives dispatchers additional pieces of information that might be helpful in an emergency.

A new service is available to Cache Valley residents who find themselves calling 911 with an emergency.

Smart911 is a web-based platform that can save critical time in an emergency when seconds can be the difference between life and death.
The program gives users the option of creating a profile that gives dispatchers additional pieces of information that might be helpful in an emergency.

For example, Shelley Peterson, director of Logan City Police Department Communications Division, said she herself has noted the location of a large propane tank on her property in case there is a fire at her home.

Dispatchers say they received a call from someone last week who noted multiple family members with severe bee allergies. If the 911 caller is having a severe reaction and is unable to speak but can make the call, the dispatcher has this information and can alert medical responders, Peterson said.
“The information is only available when a 911 call is placed. It is not searchable, it is private and secure and it is only used when someone calls 911,” Peterson said.

To sign up or learn more about Smart911, go to www.smart911.com

Tulsa Firefighters Visit Neighbors On National Night Out

Police and Firefighters tried to visit 45 different Tulsa neighborhoods as part of Tulsa’s night out. The hope – foster a better relationship between neighbors and first responders. Police also encouraged people to sign up for Smart911.
To sign up or learn more about Smart911, go to www.smart911.com

Orange County Honors Emergency Responders

ORANGE COUNTY, Va. (NEWSPLEX) — Orange County honored its first responders at a ceremony Monday that also highlighted a new lifesaving technology the county is using called Smart911.

It’s a service that provides health and location information to emergency responders and enables faster response when 911 is called or texted on a cellphone in areas that use Smart911.

Orange County resident John Nettles said his wife, Carol, a nurse, had registered with Smart911, and it proved life saving when he suffered a heart attack on his farm.

“They had my entire medical history. They knew what to do. They knew access to the farm,” he said.

And the information Smart911 provided allowed EMTs to call ahead to the hospital so Nettles bypassed the emergency room and was quickly seen and treated at Martha Jefferson Hospital by a cardiologist.

Orange County Fire and EMS paramedic Kyle Ronn said the technology made a difference.

“It gave us ample time to figure out where he was, all of his history that he had put on to the Smart911 system, and it let us know what we were getting ourselves into before we even got there,” he said.

Orange County is currently the only locality in the Charlottesville area using Smart911.

www.newsplex.com

New App To Help Texas Tech Students Stay Safe On Campus

LUBBOCK, TX (KCBD) – A new safety initiative is underway at Texas Tech: a mobile app called Raider Safe. The Student Government Association and the department called RISE are working to educate students, faculty and staff about the app and how it can benefit them.

SGA External Vice President Alex DeRossi says so far, the campus has responded positively as they continue to learn about this new safety resource.

Most people are familiar with the emergency “blue lights” on campus, and as DeRossi explained, this app is a basically a mobile form of those as you can press a panic button that dials directly to Texas Tech PD.

But there are other features, such as a tool to make reporting crimes easier. Students can take a photo and anonymously submit something they feel isn’t right to Tech PD.

“We thought an app would be the best way to be progressive in that area of offering these safety features with something that you’re always holding,” DeRossi said.

“We want all of the students to hear about it. We want them to try it out, give us feedback on it. This is our kind of first rodeo going to this kind of safety app stuff.”

To download the app just search “Rave Guardian” in the app store. Logging in with your Texas Tech email address converts the app to Raider Safe.

“If students don’t feel safe on campus, they’re not going to be productive, they’re not going to be efficient, they aren’t going to do well here. So that is number one priority for us. And I think a lot of our initiatives are focused around that, with this app kind of being a good cornerstone of it. And us being able to put it in the hands of every student,” DeRossi said.

As he said they are still testing it out, and feedback about ways to improve is welcomed by emailing any of the SGA officers.

Or you can visit their website, http://www.depts.ttu.edu/sga/ to find contact information.

www.kcbd.com

Edwardsville Ranks Among Safest College Towns

Edwardsville ranked number 25 on a list of the top 30 safest college towns in America by SafeWise.com.

After taking into consideration the recent additions to public safety in Edwardsville, such as the new SIUE Fire Station and the in-progress new public safety facility building, it can be said that safety is a top priority for both the city and SIUE.

 The article states, “As the third oldest city in the Prairie State and home to five state governors, Edwardsville has a long history of civic duty and community spirit. That enthusiasm extends to public safety, both for the city and its large Southern Illinois University campus. Each quadrant of the city has a dedicated beat officer that gets to know the residents and their needs in order to provide long-term solutions and improve quality of life for Edwardsville citizens. Likewise, the SIUE police work with students to prevent crime on campus and ensure a safe, supportive learning environment.”

Beat System

The beat system consists of four beats, each with four officers. The program was designed to provide more community service and enhance the safety within each location. Edwardsville Police Chief Jay Keeven said the beat system has proven effective and the officers in the EPD are very approachable and always willing to serve in any situation.

“I would say that the beat officer program itself I think is good – that individuals get to know the people that work that particular area of the city. We typically assign those beats for periods of time, whether that be two months or maybe someone will be assigned the same beats for a year,” Keeven said.

“Realistically, the fact that we are responsive to the citizens that we serve, so no matter if you know your beat officer or you just happen to see an officer in your neighborhood that’s not normally assigned to that beat, we are going to respond to your call of service,” Keeven said.

Community Outreach

Aside from the beat system, Keeven said another factor that separates the EPD from others is their dedication to community outreach.

“I think we have a done good deal, over the years, of public outreach. That starts in the schools and when young people get to know our officers and the resource officers in the D.A.R.E. program that District 7 supports wholeheartedly, those young people grow up to be young adults and then middle-aged adults and then retirees that know police officers in their community and have a working relationship with them. I don’t know that just the police department stands out, but the community stands out. Our community refuses to compromise with crime, and if they see something that doesn’t look appropriate, they call us,” Keeven said.

In addition, the EPD also uses a recently-acquired records management program called New World, which helps the EPD keep track of crime activity and what areas to attend to next, according to Keeven.

“We’ve used that a little over a year now and we are able to capture statistical data from our computer-assisted dispatch so we can know how many neighborhood checks we have done, we can know how many businesses we have done, we can know how many community presentations we have done. So I believe that what we measure is what matters,” he said.

Relationships Between Departments

Going forward, Keeven said the city of Edwardsville and public safety will continue to grow and expand, as will the working relationships between the departments.

“The working relationship we have with our fire department is fantastic; they work very well with our police officers. I will also tell you that the working relationship we have with the SIU Police Department — they are the biggest part of what makes the SIU campus safe. If they need assistance, they can call us and we’d be happy to assist them. If we need assistance, we can call them, the Madison County police department, the state police, Maryville, Troy. We have a good working relationship and there aren’t any egos involved as far as ‘this is our area’ and ‘this is your area.’ We work very well together with police and fire personnel throughout this entire region,” he said.

The SIUE Police Department has also played a significant role in maintaining a safe college town and campus. SIUE Police Chief Kevin Schmoll said safety is a high priority for the university and they are always working to keep it that way.

“We work very closely with student affairs, the dean of students, housing, and counseling services. We meet once a week, we go over all of the police reports that we have with representatives from those other departments, and decide who needs to step in. By doing that, we are able to keep the campus safe. That’s just one of the many things. The administration here at the university is dedicated to keeping the university police department fully staffed, which is very important,” Schmoll said.

Rave Guardian Utilized

A year ago, the SIUE PD also started utilizing the app Rave Guardian, a personal safety app that allows students, faculty, and staff to stay connected to the Police Department in the case of a situation. Schmoll said more incoming students are signing up for the app and the SIUE PD hopes to inform others on campus.

“It’s an app that’s free to students, faculty, and staff. They download the app on their smartphone or tablet and they are able to communicate with our dispatcher. Students can text our dispatcher with anything going on, if they need assistance; they can turn their cellphone into an emergency phone. If they can’t talk, they’ll give us GPS coordinates and a map of their location and our officers can drive to them, get to them for assistance. Or, they can link up with Guardians as late as they want,” Schmoll said.

Social Media

Despite working alongside the EPD and the Edwardsville Fire Department, Schmoll said the SIUE PD hopes to expand its media presence and build on its relations with the SIUE and the Edwardsville community in the future.

“We definitely want to always build on our community relations and with the university, student population, faculty and staff; any training that we can do. We want to get more of the hostile-intruder training, do presentations on safety, alcohol and drug abuse. One thing I want to improve on is getting into the social media aspect. The police department has a Facebook page, but maybe work on a Twitter account, because that seems to be the trend. People don’t look at emails anymore; we send out emails about safety stuff, but I think we need to go more the social media route,” Schmoll said.

 

To learn more about the city of Edwardsville and public safety, visit www.cityofedwardsville.com.

For the rest of the story: www.theintelligencer.com

By: Cody King

Campus Police Use Parking Pass Increase Revenue For New Safety App

featureimageapp-2-576x437The cost for an Indiana Wesleyan University parking pass increased this year from $15 to $50.

According to Mario Rangel, director of Campus Police and emergency management, the revenue from the increase is going to be used “strictly for emergency preparedness and safety.”

Some of the revenue will go to installing security cameras, purchasing new uniforms and laptops, to train students who worktimerpic-438x320 for the department and more.

The revenue was also used to launch a new safety app called The Rave Guardian.  With this app, students are able to use their student e-mail address for a login and be able to add their information to their profile. There are multiple features on the app to ensure campus safety for students.
One feature in the app is a safety timer, where students can set a timer for themselves for when they will be back to their destination. If the timer expires, it will notify Campus Police.

Another feature is submitting an anonymous tip, where a student can share information with Rangel without him knowing their identity.

“It’stipspic-1-335x320 just a way for students to report things that may be difficult to report if they are their co-workers or friends,” Rangel said. “But yet you’re still concerned about this person’s safety.”

Other features on the app include an emergency contact list, a button to call Campus Police and a button to call 9-1-1.

Rangel said he is very appreciative of students paying for the parking passes so Campus Police is able to improve the safety on campus.

“It’s all thanks to everyone for the parking permits and for students pouring into this,” Rangel said. “We’re going to use the money the best we know how to keep the students safe.”

Students who want to know more information about why the parking passes increased and about the department, can click on the “Campus Police” tab under “IWU Life” on MyPortal.

App Promises Faster Response Time To School Threats

This year officials from 13 Nassau County school districts have a smartphone app that can quickly notify police of an active shooter in a school.

Nassau officials say they have spent almost $1.5 million on the app and hope all public and private schools will take advantage it.

Lee Mendel, founder and CEO of the Massapequa-based Intralogic Solutions, developed the app. He says schools will be better prepared to face a Newtown-type scenario.  WSHU Public Radio

“You know, seconds matter, seconds save lives: We really put this technology together to really enhance the response time to hopefully save some seconds that will save lives. ”

If there were an active shooter, school administrators would be able to contact Nassau police at the push of a button on the app. Once activated, police can view real-time surveillance cameras and even lock and unlock doors.

Mendel says more Nassau and some Suffolk County schools are also evaluating the app.

By JD Allen

wshu.org

Nassau County Launches New Emergency Alert Systems For Schools

Just in time for the new school year, Nassau County announced that several local public school districts have adopted a new smartphone-based emergency alert system.smartphone_app-1473194770-3635

The software, built by Massapequa-based IntraLogic Solutions, allows a school administrator or teacher to use an app to send an alert to first responders in an emergency with the click of a button.

Once an alert is issued by school personnel, police can automatically access critical contact information and floor plans, control remote door locks and view live footage from closed-circuit security cameras so that responding officers receive real-time intelligence.

In addition, first responders will be able to use the app on smartphones and tablets on site, giving them greater situational awareness so they can react to emergencies including active shooters.

“From mobile alert technology to first responder alerts and accessing school closed-circuit cameras, this state-of-the-art school security program is leading the nation in protecting our children,” Nassau County Executive Edward Mangano said. “I urge school officials to join us in keeping our kids safe, as Nassau Police are at the ready to implement this program at all public and private schools countywide.”

The program is already operational in both the Merrick and Bellmore school districts. In addition, the Bethpage, Farmingdale, Herricks, Island Park, Levittown, Lynbrook, Manhasset, BOCES, North Shore, Oyster Bay, Sewanhaka and Valley Stream school districts have already signed an agreement for police to access their camera systems.

The Garden City, Island Park, Jericho, Levittown, Manhasset, North Bellmore and North Merrick are all expected to have the program running within the next few weeks. The goal is to have all of the county’s 57 school districts on the system.

The program is free for the school districts.

“This system will provide our responding officers with critical intelligence that will not only save time, but will save lives,” Acting Police Commissioner Thomas Krumpter said. “While we hope that this system is never truly needed, it is important for us to prepare in case a tragedy, like the many we have seen around the country, strikes here in Nassau County.”

By

 

www.patch.com

Taking Their Message To The Street

Most of us don’t think about the Orange Street Festival as a place to learn something. Most likely, we think of it as a place to get food on a stick or funnel cakes, to get free give-aways from local business12195857_997213256968868_8147162260140873299_nes, to shop among dozens of arts and crafts vendors and, perhaps more than anything else, to see and be seen.

But Saturday’s 41st Orange Street Festival, sponsored by the Orange County Chamber of Commerce, also offers two important educational opportunities. Certainly, there are multiple opportunities for us to learn things at each street festival–whether it’s what local services businesses have to offer, or information about political candidates, voter registration or the efforts of local civic groups.

This year, the Orange County Office on Youth and Orange County E-911 will be at the street festival offering important and interesting information to those who stop by.

At the E-911 booth, county emergency communication staff will share information about Smart911—a progressive new service provided by the county that can simplify and speed-up the process when citizens call 911.

Smart911 allows citizens to link their cell phones or landlines to crucial information they have provided, in advance, through a user-generated safety profile.

When citizens place a call to 911, using a Smart911-registered phone, the system recognizes the number and displays the safety profile on the call-taker’s screen. Setting up a safety profile takes about 10 minutes, and family members can be added.

There is no charge for the service and information may be updated at any time. Utilizing Smart911 can save precious time, especially during an emergency when communication is difficult.

Citizens can provide as much or as little information as they want. Smart911 only asks for information relevant to 911 responders in the event of an emergency and information is housed in secure facilities.

Meanwhile, at the Office on Youth booth, participants can get a preview of the effects of poor lifestyle choices. The office will debut its new APRIL Face Aging Software, a program that utilizes scientific age progression technology to produce personal and customized results for users and demonstrates the difference between those who age naturally and those who engage in risky behavior.

The software is effective for anyone between the ages of 7 and 70 and can show each individual who participates the stark differences between natural aging and the effects of smoking, sun exposure and obesity to improve their decision making. The differences can be jarring.

So when we’re out at the street festival Saturday, collecting our swag, eating street food, supporting local causes and doing a little shopping, let’s invest a few minutes in our own well-being by signing up for Smart911 and seeing how we can improve our inward and outward appearance by making healthier lifestyle choices.

By Jeff Poole

www.dailyprogress.com

 

U of Minnesota Offers Smart911 Safety Service To Students

u of m_1441299563520_154511_ver1.0  – The University of Minnesota is offering students and staff a new safety service that will help provide information more quickly when they call 911 during an emergency.

The service is called Smart911. It allows students and staff to create a safety profile online that includes any information they want 911 dispatchers to have access to in an emergency. Safety profiles can include information such as dorm, apartment or office locations, emergency contacts, medical history or a photo. When students or staff members make a 911 call from their cell phone, the safety profile is immediately displayed to the 911 dispatcher.

“The information may reduce the amount of time it takes to locate you in an emergency, or provide first responders critical information necessary to treat a serious medical condition,” the U of M Department of Public Safety said in a statement.

Smart911 is new to the U of M, but it is already being used in more than 1,500 cities across the country Anytime an individual dials 911 in a location that supports Smart911, their safety profile will be available to that 911 dispatcher.

U of M students, faculty, staff and visitors can sign up for the service and create their safety profile at smart911.com. All information in the profile is private and will only be seen by a someone when the owner calls 911.

www.fox9.com

CG First Responders to Get ‘Smart’ with Patient Info

Smart911 is a brand of communication technology that stores an individual’s personal information such as medical history and makes it available to emergency dispatchers and responders.

It works by getting citizens to voluntarily create a Smart911 profile, allowing them to list as much personal information as they want to disclose. This profile will pop up on a local dispatcher’s computer screen when the registered user calls 911.

Mike Brashier, the city’s communications manager, said access to this type of personal information allows paramedics, police officers and firefighters to make more informed decisions out in the field. He said while pitching Smart911 to the Casa Grande City Council on Monday night that it could reduce response times.

The council unanimously approved spending $32,000 on a three-year contract to use Smart911. Before voting, some council members had questions involving the logistics of how the software works.

Councilwoman Mary Kortsen asked whether this personal information of residents would be kept confidential. Brashier said a resident’s profile only becomes accessible to dispatchers when the resident calls 911 and the profile remains open for about 45 minutes before going back into the Smart911 database.

Councilman Matt Herman asked how the city could keep track of the number of residents creating Smart911 profiles, as he wouldn’t want the city to invest in a program that gets little use.

Each municipality that uses Smart911 in the United States can count the number of users it services through local ZIP codes, according to Michele Nelson, regional sales manager of Rave Mobile Safety, the company that sells Smart911. She estimated at least 12 million Americans have so far registered with Smart911.

Since creating a Smart911 profile is voluntary, some council members wondered how the city would convince residents to participate in the program.

Nelson said Rave Mobile Safety will be assisting the city in organizing public outreach events and social media campaigns. Mayor Bob Jackson indicated he hopes the city periodically updates the council on how many residents are using Smart911.

Tempe was the first municipality in Arizona to use Smart911 in 2014. Eloy and Paradise Valley are other communities that have since adopted the program.

The Casa Grande Fire Department is already able receive information in “real time” while responding to a call, according to Battalion Chief Frank Ricci. Currently, city dispatchers ask a series of questions to 9-1-1 callers and that information is logged and instantly sent to first responders as they head out to a site.

Information can continue to be updated by dispatchers while firefighters are en route, Ricci said. But having access to additional background information on a person or place would be beneficial for everyone, he added. The idea is that Smart911 would streamline this question-and-answer process between 9-1-1 callers and dispatchers.

Aside from basic medical history, Smart911 users can also post pictures of family members on their profile in case someone goes missing and describe the physical layouts of their homes.

Users can also mention whether English is not their primary language on their profile and list family members or friends who should be contacted in times of an emergency.

More information on the program is available at smart911.com.

By KEVIN REAGAN Staff Writer

trivalleycentral.com

Safety Is Priority

Safety is always a top priority for law enforcement officers, parents, and the like. This year has been ridden with crime and safety issues all over the nation.  And we all know move in at ISU has been taking place this week. So it’s a great time for a refresher of safety tips and practices as students return to the Wabash Valley. Roughly 30 emergency blue lights are strategically placed around the Sycamore campus.

With an info button and a call button, public safety or ISU police will respond to the alerted area within a timely manner.

There’s also an app out called rave guardian, which lets students input a “guardian” or friend, and the app tells them when they should arrive at a location on campus. If the person does not reach that location in the suggested time, the guardian is alerted and then 911 is called. GPS access also tracks the where-a-bouts of the person walking, for easy identification. Michele Barrett, assistant chief of police at ISU says parents who want to be in the know, have an easy way to access that information.

“They are also eligible to sign up for the rave text messaging,” says Barrett.  “So on our website, at public safety, you can put your parents or guardian’s, whoever would want to get any of that information of what goes on on campus. They just put in their smartphone number and they will get the same text messages as the students.”

The rave guardian app is downloadable on both Google Play and the App Store for free.

By: Rebecca Brumfield

Rave Mobile Safety Stays Alert When Students Aren’t

Students got their first taste of Eastern’s safety alert systems last week after a traffic stop-turned drug-fueled  police chase ended on campus.Eastern Progress

Four juveniles were stopped by a Madison County Sheriff’s Department officer near Lancaster and Main after a report of shots fired in the early hours of Monday, August 22. The men, all of Lexington, sped off and initiated a police chase involving the sheriff, Richmond Police (RPD) and EKU Police (EKUPD) departments. RPD and EKUPD were alerted and prepared for whatever would come next.

The perpetrators, still fleeing, zoomed up the opposite way of traffic flow of University Drive around 2:30 a.m., but RPD and EKUPD were waiting at the other end.

“I don’t think they cared at that point about traffic laws,” said Bryan Makinen, EKU’s executive director of Public Safety and Risk Management.

The men were charged with trafficking cocaine and marijuana, as well as possession of drug paraphernalia. The driver was also slapped with a DUI.

Students may not have been aware of the wild night at the time, but they were at least notified of it through EKU’s primary public safety alert system, RAVE.

Gary Folckemer, EKU’s director of Emergency Management & Security, said there’s seven alert mediums within rave. First there’s texts, voice calls and emails, the latter of which is what most students were alerted by the night of the chase. Those three are more personal, and can be targeted to specific people who might be affected by an event.

Then there’s the “blast” methods, which include alerts on computer screens, RSS feeds to police pages, social media and sirens. There are four sirens on campus part of the 90-siren system in Madison County, and they can act independently of the larger system. But Folckemer said sirens are “both a system of first resort and a system of last resort.”

“It’s kind of a one-trick pony,” Folckemer said. “You send it out and it’s a blast out there, and you’re fairly limited to what you can do. Whereas Rave mobile safety allows you to target individuals.”

The more personal methods of alert allow for custom messages, Folckemer said, and don’t send the entire community into a panic.

As much as the RAVE system covers campus, student participation is low. According to Folckemer, 3,935 voice calls, 4,135 texts and 21,932 emails were sent out the night of the drug chase. When students register for classes and begin the school year, their emails are automatically registered in RAVE. However, you have to go online and register a phone number manually.

Folckemer expressed the importance and ease of getting student phone numbers registered on RAVE, as well as downloading the EKU Student Government-developed LiveSafe app.

“Take the time to put your mobile phone number into Rave,” Folckemer said. “It’s pretty easy to do, and we don’t just send those texts and those voice calls for just everything at 2 o’clock in the morning.”

To register a number in RAVE, visit EKU Direct. The system purges numbers every semester, so it has to be updated every semester. Community members can also sign up for RAVE by visiting getrave.com.

Makinen said campus safety is something EKU Public Safety takes personally and seriously, and they’re always available.

“We want to create that protective envelope and address whatever situation for the protection of all,” Makinen said. “That’s why we’re here.”

By:

www.easternprogress.com

Smart911 Now Available for Logan/Cache County Area

Public Safety Officials Encourage All Residents to Sign Up For the Free Service That Better Protects Residents in an Emergency, Improves Emergency Response & Helps Save Lives Emergency

 

Logan Letterhead

Logan, Utah, August 31, 2016 – Residents of Cache County can now sign up for a new safety initiative, residents Smart911, which is available to all individuals. Smart911 is a free service that allows individuals and families to sign up online and provide key information to 9 1 centers. This information enables faster9-1-1 and more effective emergency response by law enforcement, fire, and emergency medical services.

The Smart911 platform saves critical time in an emergency when seconds can be the difference between life and death. The additional information provided in a Smart911 Safety Profile helps 911 professionals send the right response to the right location with the right information.

Smart911 enables residents to create a Safety Profile at www.smart911.com for their entire household. Residents can customize their profile and share any information they want 9 1 and response teams to have in the event of an emergency. All information in the Safety Profile is private and secure. It is automatically displayed to 9-1-1 professionals ONLY when the resident dials 9-1-1.19

The benefits of this additional information on a 9-1-1 call from a cell phone are immeasurable. Mobile phones do not provide an exact address to the 9-1-1 call takers. In situations like a house fire, seconds9-1-1matter and the additional information with the Smart911 platform enables help to arrive faster. Additionally, Smart911 allows 9-1-1 dispatchers to send & receive SMS text messages to mobile phone message callers that placed a 9-1-1 call, but cannot safely communicate audibly.

Smart911 is currently available in more than 1,500 municipalities in 40 different states and has been credited with positively impacting the outcomes of numerous emergency situations. For example, situations a struggling heart attack victim in Tennessee was saved because his safety profile immediately displayed an address and medical notes, which allowed responders to be dispatched to his location quickly.

Citizens are encouraged to create their Safety Profile with Smart911 today to have their information immediately available to  9-1-1 and first responders. Smart911 is private and secure, is only used for1emergency responses, and only made available to the 9 1 system in the event an emergency call is made.

Contact:

Shelley Peterson, 911 Director

Logan City Police Department Communications Division