What We're Talking About This Week - October 25th

Picture of Mary Kate McGrath By Mary Kate McGrath

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In The News 

Arkansas and Oklahoma share data centers to improve disaster recovery efforts. According to a new report, Woolsey fire response was hurt by poor disaster preparation and lack of firefighters. Security can take many forms, and continuous evaluation is key to preventing workplace violence.  A week after an off-duty sergeant became the 10th officer to die by suicide this year, New York City to provide NYPD officers with free mental healthcare. This year, the Department of Justice awarded $85.3 million in grants to prevent school violence to schools, districts, and municipalities. It's common knowledge that doctor's work long hours, but are too many patients making doctor's sick?

Key Points: 

  • The U.S. is facing what has been called a severe and growing epidemic of physician burnout, with nearly half of all clinicians reporting feelings of exhaustion, depression, depersonalization and failure
  • When asked to identify the cause of physician burnout, more than half of healthcare professionals cite mounting bureaucratic or administrative tasks, followed by long hours at work, lack of respect, increased computerization at their practice and insufficient compensation
  • Many Electronic Health Records today face two major issues: lack of understanding of the varying needs of different healthcare practices and an inability to share patient data across systems 
  • The digital revolution has spurred dramatic increases in productivity and efficiency across countless industries, but the healthcare space remains oddly separate from much of this positive change

This Week From The Rave Team 

Read some of the stories our writers were most excited to share with you this week. To access all of our stories, check out our blog

PA Bill: A Template For Addressing Sexual Assault on Campus

pennsylvania legilature In 2019, Pennsylvania passed a law requiring stronger sexual assault reporting on campus, giving colleges and universities one year to develop online reporting systems to receive complaints about sexual assault from students, faculty, and staff, according to the Associated Press. Reports, including anonymous submissions, must be investigated, according to the college or university campus policy, which the law also requires schools to create. In addition to improving the way Title IX cases are managed on campus, lawmakers hope the new bill will provide insight on the scope of sexual assault on campus, and allow safety managers to take targeted action. According to Governor Tom Wolf, the law is the first of its kind in the United States, and state legislators hope the bill will provide a helpful outline for other states looking to address the issue.

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5 Tips for a Successful Joint Commission Accreditation Survey

healthcare joint commission accreditation surveyThe Joint Commission is an independent, not-for-profit organization that “accredits” more than twenty-two thousand healthcare organizations and healthcare programs in the United States. Joint Commission accreditation is a symbol of quality that reflects an organization’s commitment to meeting certain performance standards and therefore accreditation is highly sought and - once achieved - highly prized.

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What Is A K-12 School Safety Audit?

School SafetyK-12 safety managers should use a school safety audit to determine the strengths and weaknesses of their current safety and security practices, from physical security measures like security cameras and access control, to mental health resources, such as counselors or social workers. By conducting a school safety audit, safety managers can get a better concept of their school’s safety and security, identify any areas for improvement, and disrupt practices which contribute to the school-to-prison pipeline. The audit process is a proactive step toward creating a safe, secure, and inclusive learning environment. 

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Rave In the News 

Arkansas public and open-enrollment charter K-12 schools had an additional tool to protect their campuses beginning Tuesday. Through Rave Eyewitness, an anonymous-tip texting platform, students, faculty and parents can now discreetly report suspicious behavior or threats to designated authorities. In 2018, the Arkansas School Safety Commission recommended the state create a strategy to allow anonymous reporting of suspicious behavior or threats. Rave Eyewitness will allow users to report bullying, harassment, violent actions, threats or unusual behavior from students who may be struggling with self-harm or severe depression. Early reporting of unusual or concerning behavior will prevent crises and save lives," John Ciesla, superintendent of the Greenwood School District, told the Texarkana Gazette. "Rave Eyewitness will keep Arkansas schools safe so we can focus on helping our children reach their potential."

Read the whole store here. 

 

Mary Kate McGrath

Written by Mary Kate McGrath

Mary Kate is a content specialist and social media manager for the Rave Mobile Safety team. She writes about public safety for the state & local and education spheres.

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