What We're Talking About This Week - January 10th

Picture of Mary Kate McGrath By Mary Kate McGrath

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In the News

The University of Colorado received a grant to study effectiveness of school safety protocol, updating school safety guidelines and evaluating how educators can use the protocol to better protect students. Secret Service offers training to hundres of Pennsylvania educators and safety officials, focused on identifying troubled individuals and preventing violence. New Michigan school is designed to foil active shooters, with modern security measures tucked in architectural innovation. Anti-bullying policies should be central to a credible safety culture, with management response to hidden, verbal, or non-verbal abuse in the workplace. An overlooked danger: school shootings after hours, was reported on by the New York Times. 

Key Points: 

  • Since mid-August, gunfire has erupted more than 20 times at or near school sporting events around the country, more shootings than took place during school hours. Since the start of 2013, at least 19 people have been killed and more than 100 wounded in shootings with some connection to school sporting events.
  • Shootings at school events are a longstanding problem. But efforts to prevent them have been halting, piecemeal and, in some cases, virtually nonexistent.
  • Federal researchers estimated that about 1,800 children were killed by gunfire in the United States in 2017, and that thousands more were wounded. School sports shootings have been reported in 36 states since 2013, but three-quarters of the incidents have happened in the Midwest and the South.
  • In the most notorious school-day shootings, attackers made detailed plans for their massacres. But in many shootings at after-school activities, the violence was more spontaneous, a consequence of a fight or teenage dispute that escalated. For the people injured, and even for some who are not, the trauma does not quickly fade.

This Week From The Rave Team 

Read some of the stories our writers were most excited to share with you this week. To access all of our stories, check out our blog.

How To Keep Students Informed About Identity Theft

student identity theft In 2017, the Federal Trade Commission reported a 20% increase in consumers reporting credit card fraud and other identity theft, while student loan fraud increased by 120%, according to Consumer Reports. Identity Theft, which occurs when thieves steal personal identifying information, such as your name, social security number, address, or credit card information, often targets college-age young adults. College students are at high-risk for identity theft because they're unlikely to have a lot of transaction history, and younger, undergraduate students are often victims of fraud. Gen Z students, who are digital natives, are also common targets for online phishing scams, increasing risk of identity theft. It’s critical for campus safety managers to keep the commmunity informed about identity theft, given that college and university students are among the most-targeted demographics for these crimes. 

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Rural Hospital Closures and the Impact on Hospital Emergency Preparedness

rural hospitalRural hospital closures not only have economic and healthcare consequences for local communities, they also impact the operations of nearby hospitals. There are also significant consequences for how nearby hospitals will have to respond to a natural or man-made emergency. Concern over rural hospital closures is not a new phenomenon. Following the introduction of the prospective payment system for Medicare beneficiaries in 1983, many rural hospitals closed due to financial distress - raising fears a thousand hospitals could close before the end of the decade. 

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Winter Weather Safety for K-12 Schools

school bus winter weatherWith temperatures dropping across the United States as winter settles in, it’s important that K-12 schools and districts have a good understanding of potential winter safety hazards that could impact students, faculty, and staff. Winter weather can certainly take its toll, with heavy snow and freezing rain being responsible for numerous traffic fatalities each year. Weather.gov explains that hundreds of deaths and injuries from hypothermia, exposure, and frostbite are reported each year as bitter cold air masses plunge into the United States during the winter. For this reason, schools must be on alert for winter weather dangers and fully understand what safety hazards to be prepared for.

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Rave In The News

A mass-notification 911 system that will allow the town to alert residents of emergency situations is in the works, and is expected to be complete by the end of February or early March. The Selectboard heard from Police Chief Daniel Galvis — who is acting as Leyden’s field representative for the safety technology provider, Rave Mobile Safety — about the system’s progress during its meeting Monday night.Once implemented, the mass notification and safety profile system will allow the town to alert residents to the risk of danger by sending a message to registered landline phones or cellphones within a defined geographical area.Townspeople can choose to give their information — including landline phone number, cellphone number, email and home address — to receive emergency alerts. When signing up, residents will have the option to select their preferred method of notification. 

All information input when signing up is optional. Residents also have the option to input their medical information or mobility issues, which will not be accessible to town officials, Galvis said. Instead, the information may be seen by emergency dispatchers to improve response should someone call for help. 

Read the whole story here. 

Mary Kate McGrath

Written by Mary Kate McGrath

Mary Kate is a content specialist and social media manager for the Rave Mobile Safety team. She writes about public safety for the state & local and education spheres.

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