What We're Talking About This Week - November 15th

Picture of Mary Kate McGrath By Mary Kate McGrath

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In the News 

In November, the FBI reported a small dip in hate crimes, but rising rates of violence. Prevention is key to stopping targeted violence, according to a report released on Thursday by the United States Secret Service. Experts worry active shooter drills could be traumatic for students, and many are asking if drills, especially those with simulated gunfire, are doing more harm than good. Arctic weather hit the Midwest and Eastern United States, bringing record-breaking low temperatures and some snowfall. The rise of hospital cyberattacks has been linked to heart attack deaths in the United States. 

Key Points:

  • A rise in ransomware attacks and data breaches against hospitals across the US may account for an uptick in heart attack deaths at those hospitals, according to a new study conducted by Vanderbilt and the University of Central Florida
  • Ransomware attacks are a rising cybersecurity threat, and their frequency doubled across industries in the past year.
  • The study suggests that as hospitals were forced to adapt to cyber attacks with more robust security and overhauled IT systems, doctors and nurses were slowed down in providing care, losing valuable seconds during emergencies
  • The delayed treatment times at those hospitals wasn't just a direct consequence of the breach — they were also impacted by doctors and nurses adjusting to IT changes that the hospitals implemented to recover from the breach, according to the researcher

This Week From The Rave Team 

Read some of the stories our writers were most excited to share with you this week. To access all of our stories, check out our blog

Why Colleges and Universities Should Hire Veterans For Campus Safety Officers

soldiers salute For campus safety managers, hiring a team of safety officers and security personnel who are able to handle a range of emergency situations, from an active assailant on campus to a student who needs medical assistance, can be difficult. One of the most important security measures college or university administrators can take is to hire high-skilled workers who can handle complex safety concerns with sensitivity and ease. Veterans, service members, and reservists are uniquely qualified for campus safety roles, as these individuals possess unmatched technology, organizational, and communication skills. Hiring managers should make a proactive effort to include veterans in their search, as these individuals are likely to be among the strongest candidates. 

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Why It's Not Too Early to Think about Workplace Winter Weather Preparedness

winter weather preparednessIf your workplace has been sweltering in the record temperatures recently experienced by much of the country, you may think it is a little premature to think about workplace winter weather preparedness. However, a “Polar Coaster” has been forecast for this winter, and it could happen sooner than predicted.

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What To Know About the IPAWS Lab Cloud Update

alert phoneIn October, FEMA put in place a requirement for Integrated Public Alert & Warning System (IPAWS) alerting authorities to conduct mandatory monthly proficiency demonstrations. Each authority or Collaborative Operating Group (COG) is required to send at least one successful EAS or WEA message to the IPAWS Lab Cloud every month. There are more than 1,100 federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial areas that can use IPAWS to issue critical public alerts and warnings, and many more authorities are in the process of implementing IPAWS to issue alerts. 

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Rave In The News 

In Ralston, Nebraska, schools are embracing technology to make schools safer. Every staff member will have a new app on their phone called the Rave Panic Button, and if a teacher sees a possible threat they simply have to pick up their phone and hit a button. It puts the school on lock down and directly dials 911, something only one part of the school could do in the past. "They see something that doesn't look right, they see something that would raise their alarm or their suspicion, they're able to put the building into an appropriate safety mode so we can make sure their staff and their students are all safe,” says Jason Buckingham, director of business and assistant superintendent at Ralston Public Schools.

Read the whole story here. 

Mary Kate McGrath

Written by Mary Kate McGrath

Mary Kate is a content specialist and social media manager for the Rave Mobile Safety team. She writes about public safety for the state & local and education spheres.

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