Local Ohio Colleges Motivated to Keep Students Safe


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Colleges around the country have to hope for the best, but still plan for the worst, and the shootings on the Virginia Tech campus have prompted school’s like the University of Dayton to keep their students and faculty  notified in any emergency.

“It’s important so you can get updated on anything on campus: if they’re out of power, or if there is a shooting,” UD Sophomore Gaston Pleiman said. “You’re certainly not going to put yourself in danger; and maybe you can help text one of your friends if they don’t sign up for it.”

UD’s Chief of Police tells us they’ve used their emergency notification system about ten times since it was implemented in 2007, after the first shooting at Virginia Tech. However, most of the uses have been weather related.

“We only send them out when it’s a true emergency,” UD’s Chief of Police Bruce Burt said. “We don’t want to over use, if we do for non-emergency, people will have tendency to ignore them.”

UD has 15,000 subscribers to notify in an emergency, while across town at Wright State, they have 36,000.

Whether it is a snow closure or something more grave like what happened on Virginia Tech’s campus, schools like Wright State University can notify their students in seven different ways. Six of them can be found right on your phone.

“No single communications channel can be relied upon to reach everyone at one time, so we use multiple modes,” said Emergency Management Administrator at Wright State University Michael Coons. “We’ll send out emails, voice-mails text messages.

They’ll also send out information through the intercoms in each building. As of August, Wright State now will send out alerts using Facebook and Twitter.

“Especially now that everyone has smart phones they can get it right on their phone,” Wright State Admissions Counselor Andrea Fleischman said.

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